Scholarly Editing

The Annual of the Association for Documentary Editing

2016, Volume 37

Extracts from The Young Idea

by A.D. McArthurEdited by Mary Isbell
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"The Young Idea"

"Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal

Saturday 23rd January 1858

No. 7

What these prospects may be, we are unable to determine at present, although, we may almost dispel the idea of seeing service before the enemy, as we had hoped, our proceedings will most likely consist in various kinds of extra duties, as unpleasant as they are unremunerative.
But, at this, we must not repine, for, as our gallant CommodoreX

Commodore Rundle Burges Watson

From “Watson, Rundle Burges” by by J. K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Watson, Rundle Burges (1809–1860), naval officer, was the eldest son of Captain Joshua Rowley Watson (1772–1810). He entered the navy in November 1821, and was promoted lieutenant on 7 October 1829. [. . .] On 23 December 1842 he was advanced to post rank, and on 24 December was made a CB. [. . .] In December 1852 [Watson] was appointed to the new steam frigate Impérieuse (50 guns), then, and for some years later, considered one of the finest ships in the navy. In 1854 she was sent into the Baltic in advance of the fleet, Watson being senior officer of the squadron of small vessels appointed to watch the breaking up of the ice, and to see that no Russian warships got to sea. It was an arduous service well performed. The Impérieuse continued with the flying squadron in the Baltic during the campaigns of 1854 and 1855, and until the signing of peace in March 1856. As the senior officer of the frigate squadron, and generally on detached service, Watson demonstrated the highest standards of seamanship, judgement, and leadership. After the peace the Impérieuse was sent to the North American station; she returned to England and was paid off early in 1857. From May 1856 until his death Watson was naval aide-de-camp to the queen. In June 1859 he was appointed captain-superintendent of Sheerness Dockyard, where he died on 5 July 1860. An officer of great ability, Watson was one of the last great sailing-ship captains, and the first frigate captain of the steam era."
expressed in his speech last Sunday, we do as much good, in assisting the arrival, or departure of vessels, in provisioning, storing, repairing, conveying troops or other equally tame work, as though we were in the field; no doubt, some may be inclined to say, that this is merely a propitiatory view of the case, but, we say, it is the fact, and although our inclination leads us to think otherwise and to feel dissatisfied with the failure of our dearest hopes, yet, this should not lessen our zeal in the exercise of our various duties, and hope must brighten our path with the expectation, of not always having such unsatisfactory employment.
We cannot disguise the fact that we are "too late for the fair," but yet an old adage says "better late than never" and who knows, or who can foretell, what fortunate circumstances may occur, to reward us for our present disappointment.
Of the present state of the rebellion we cannot venture to say much; on shore, one heard little or View Page
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nothing of it, although we cannot fancy that the hearts of English men and women, can wholly forget the perils of their country people.
Our information of what is proceeding is therefore very limited, but we hope that next week we may be able to procure intelligence of the successful career of that gallant soldier Sir Colin CampbellX

Sir Colin Campbell

From “Campbell [formerly Macliver], Colin, Baron Clyde” by H. M. Stephens, rev. Roger T. Stearn, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Campbell [formerly Macliver], Colin, Baron Clyde (1792–1863), army officer, born Macliver, the eldest son of John Macliver (d. 22 December 1858, aged ninety-two), a carpenter in Glasgow—whose father's Ardnave estate was forfeited following the Jacobite rising of 1745—and his wife, Agnes, née Campbell, of the Campbells of Islay, was born at John Street, Glasgow, on 20 October 1792. His mother died when he was a boy, and her brother, Colonel John Campbell, paid for Colin's education. He attended Glasgow grammar school and Gosport military academy. In 1807 Colonel Campbell took him to the duke of York as candidate for a commission. The duke assumed he was ‘another of the clan’ and his name was entered as Campbell, which he thenceforth used. [. . .] In March 1857 Campbell was offered command of the expedition then forming for China, which he refused. On 11 July arrived the news of the outbreak of the Indian mutiny and the death of General Anson, the commander-in-chief in India. That day Lord Panmure offered Campbell the command-in-chief. He accepted, and started next day for India. He arrived at Calcutta in August, and heard at once the news of the recovery of Delhi by Major-General Archdale Wilson, and of Havelock's capture of Cawnpore, and his preparations for the first relief of Lucknow. Campbell hurried to Cawnpore the troops intended for the China expedition, which Lord Elgin had wisely sent to Calcutta, and assembled there also picked troops from the army which had taken Delhi. After two months of hard work organizing the troops and clearing Lower Bengal, he took command of the army at the Alambagh, and, leaving General C. A. Windham to hold Cawnpore, started on 9 November with 4700 men and 32 guns to save the British (under Outram and Havelock) at Lucknow. His force, largely European troops—and including the 93rd and Captain William Peel's naval brigade—reached Lucknow, stormed the sikandarabagh (16 November), then broke through to Outram and Havelock in the residency. Campbell evacuated the Lucknow garrison and its many dependents (11–23 November), leaving a force under Outram holding the Alambagh, 3 miles south of Lucknow. On 30 November Campbell reached Cawnpore and sent the rescued on steamers to Calcutta. [. . .] Campbell decided that a thorough defeat of the mutineers in Oudh must be the first major step towards re-establishing British rule. By March 1858 he had assembled 25,000 men for this purpose, and then began his campaign. After ten days' hard fighting he finally recaptured Lucknow on 19 March, and then by a series of operations in Oudh and Rohilkhand pacified—with the usual executions and reprisals—the north of India by May. He then paused in his own personal exertions from ill health; but it was because of his careful organization that Sir Hugh Rose was able to muster an adequate army for the campaign in central India, and because of his planning that the campaign was finally successful. In India grand strategy was decided, partly on political grounds, by Lord Canning, the governor-general. [. . .] Campbell made some mistakes: for example, his preventing Outram cutting off the mutineers' retreat after their defeat at Lucknow in March 1858, and his appointment of the notoriously bungling Brigadier-General R. Walpole to command in Rohilkhand. Nevertheless, overall Campbell was a successful commander. The mutiny further enhanced his reputation, and also enriched him by prize money. On 14 May 1858 he was promoted general; on 15 January 1858 he was made colonel of his favourite 93rd highlanders. In late 1858 and early 1859 there was indiscipline among the East India Company's European troops over their transfer to the queen's service. Campbell sympathized with their grievances and advised concession and that the men ‘be liberally dealt with’. [. . .] In June 1861, on the foundation of the order, he was appointed a knight companion of the Order of the Star of India, and on 3 July 1858 he was made Baron Clyde of Clydesdale. His health was failing, and so on 4 June 1860 he left India."
, as well as of a speedy termination to the disturbances in India.

XThis article appears as the third contribution to issue 7 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur

Here we are at last! the external appearance is novel and not uninteresting, what is the interior? Such were our reflections when we had time to look around us, and witness the busy scene,- boats of various shapes and build, dropping with the tide, with their swarthy crews, and the steersman wrapped in a linen robe, wielding the huge oar with which he guides the boat; magnificent merchant ships laying close in shore for repairs, discharging cargo, or other purposes, the forest of masts which met the gaze when it extended up the river, the hum of distant voices, the strange figures, carriages & vehicles of various descriptions passing along the Esplanade, all united to excite us with their novelty, and we were forced to satisfy our curiosity by visiting the shore.
On landing we were assailed by numbers of importunate palanquin bearers, who would hardly listen to the negatives we returned to their vociferations of "Palankie Sail" However we managed to escape in safety, and were pursuing our course towards the town when young lad came forward with an umbrella, and notwithstanding our decisive refusals of his services, he persisted in following and shading us from the sun.
We found him useful, and intelligent, and had no cause to regret making his acquaintance; he guided us to the bazaars, which reminded us forcibly of the like places for vending goods and merchandize in ConstantinopleX

Constantinople is now known as Istanbul

. The small low shops and dirty lanes, for we cannot designate them streets, the various costumes of the natives, yellow, blue, red and white, the most part clothed in little save their tawny skins, all meeting the eye in a variegated mass, as the whole extent of the bazaar was comprehended at a glance, the creaking of the drays, or waggons, drawn by two small buffaloes, and made of bamboos, with most primitive wheels and harness, the shouts of the palanquin bearers, as they staggered under the weight of some corpulent old gentleman, who perhaps, entertained the opinion that the sun might melt him, were he to expose himself; the touting of the vendors, who, with salaams, begged us to walk into, each, his particular shop, and become their customers, all this and many other circumstances which struck us at the time, brought back very strongly to our memories the streets and bazaars of ConstantinopleX

Constantinople is now known as Istanbul

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After purchasing what we required, and we found that the prices first demanded were high but easily beaten down, we determined to visit now the Esplanade, and see what was going on there. We dismissed our guide with a fee with which he appeared very well pleased, & having refreshed ourselves with an ice at Browne's Hotel, we left our purchases there and strolled forth upon the Esplanade.
Here we found Rotten Row, in miniature, whilst upon the green the lovers of exercise amused themselves with cricket, and quoits. The roads were thronged with vehicles & carriages of every description native and European, filled with ladies & gentlemen, enjoying the fresh air; after the sun had expended his power.
The complexions of the ladies did not appear to us to have suffered from the heat of the climate, but we suppose they take care not to expose themselves during the day, and thus escape, we could not for one instant entertain an idea of artificial means being resorted to.
They certainly appeared to pay as much attention to fashion as in England, but we could not wonder at that, when we saw the immense millinery, and bonnet establishments which with open doors and temptingly displayed head dresses, robes, mantles, &c, &c invited the victims to enter and become an easy prey.
The shades of night falling fast and thick, and not wishing to remain any longer on shore, we returned on board, not as well satisfied with CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

, at first sight, as we had hoped to be.

XThis article appears as the first contribution to issue 7 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "B."

On Saturday evening last (Jan 16) although no land was in sight, we found ourselves nearing the channels of the HooghlyX

Hooghly is now known as Hugli River

. At 6 P.M. we obtained soundings with the deep sea lead and two hours afterwards judging ourselves to be sufficiently near the Pilot station, we anchored for the night in 17 fathoms water, our anchor was again weighed at daylight & about 9 A.M. we passed the first large Buoy that marks the approach to the Eastern channel. At noon we were nearing the Pilot Brig, and the Pilot shortly afterwards came on board. We now ran in till 3 P.M. when the strong tide turning against us, we were again anchored for the night in 7 fathoms water. At Evening Quarters we moved several of the after guns forward to bring the vessel to an even keel: still no land in sight, though the red haze in the Evening horizon seemed to tell of its vicinity.
Daylight again found us under way and about 10 A.M. we descried the low banks of the HooghlyX

Hooghly is now known as Hugli River

, opening on either side of us. With the strong tide in our favor, and our engines working at full power, we now advanced very rapidly; the river banks drew nearer to us; SaugarX

Saugar is now known as Saugar

appeared on our right KedgereeX

Kedgeree is now known as Khejuri

on our left, with a little cluster of shipping at the anchorage. The water which on the previous day had been of a greenish hue, now became very thick and muddy. Objects on shore now became more distinct as the river lessened in width, the banks were still low & level, not an outline of any distant hills to be seen, here & there a rice plantation varied the jungle Native villages, generally clustered about some creek, where a smaller stream View Page
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joined the main river, now, and then called our attention. In the stream, we passed many vessels, less favoured than ourselves, taking advantage of the tide to move up the river; others in their downward course, lying at anchor till the tide should turn.
XThe version of the article Bampfield includes in his extracts provides a more detailed description of the river:
Native boats [indecipherable] of strange shape, with manned by a swarthy crew, floated up with the tide, & here and there a dark, loathsome object on the surface of the water marked the presence of a putrefying Hindoo Corpse.
Still the river narrowed: & the channel of the stream wd sometimes sweep us close in to one of its banks, as the widening course offered some new Reach before us. Native Villagers, generally clustered about some creek, where a smaller stream joined the main river, now & then called our attention: their huts, built of mud & thatched, overshadowed by [indecipherable]; the almost naked inhabitants watching us from the shore: their Canoes, sharply pointed & curving upwards at bow & stern, drawn up on the sloping mud banks of the River.
These, in their turn, gave way to the traces of the European Settler...
, the tall factory of red brick, the neat white house with green blinds drawn down over the windows, the regular avenue of trees, the cultivated patches of sugar cane, the brick field with piles of bricks, furnished from the dark alluvial clay, of which doubtless, the whole Delta of the Ganges is composed. As we moved swiftly up, the banks of the river glided past like a moving panorama, and the eye could never tire of watching the beautiful scene.
At sunset we came to an anchor in the Garden ReachX

Garden Reach is now known as Garden Reach

, 2 miles below CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

, one or two pretty houses decked the banks, a forest of masts marked the position of the great capital. a deep red tinge, suffused the sky as the sun sank, and was reflected streakily in the ebbing tide, soon darkness came, the river's banks were left to the howling jackal, or the crickets and toads, that made a ceaseless whirring through the watches of the night.

[No Title]

XThis article appears as the eighth contribution to issue 7 in Bampfield's extracts.
.In every shape which war could take, has the ascendancy of the British race been established. We have succeeded in capturing a strong position & we have succeeded in defending a weak one. As besiegers at DelhiX

Delhi is now known as Delhi

, as besieged at LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

, we have been equally triumphant, while the advance of our column to the capital of insurgent OudeX

Oude is now known as Ayodhya

, presents little less than a miracle of determination & courage.
The Evening Mail

    XSome of the material presented in this contribution appears as the sixth contribution to issue 7 in Bampfield's Extracts. McArthur's edition mentions the Himalaya only briefly in this contribution, but Bampfield's extracts also include the following detailed account of a visit to the Himalaya (attributed to "B.") as the second contribution to issue 10:
    A Visit to the Himalaya
    We had an opportunity, before the "Himalaya" sailed, of going round her Decks, and observing the arrangements made for the conveyance of the sick and wounded. On the upper troop-Deck, the swinging Cots were strung true and free on either side, & contained many poor fellows who had lost an arm or a leg in the late war: they had mostly formed a portion of the gallant little army which followed General Havelock to Cawnpore and Lucknow. It was distressing to see so many fine young soldiers maimed & mutilated for life by the shot or shell of these detestable Sepoys; but a happy cheerful spirit seemed to pervade them all, & one poor fellow who had lost both eyes by one musket shot, seemed the happiest & merriest of them all, as he was led about between 2 of his comrades. The lower troop-Deck was fitted with [indecipherable] for the convalescent: a few soldiers wives and children were also there, & we were struck by the sight of one poor fellow, who had lost one of his arms, nursing his little baby with the other. A few ladies also, who have endured the siege of Lucknow, but have left it widowed, are going home in the "Himalaya" as Cabin passengers.

  • Tuesday 19th H.M.S. X
    HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    Chesapeake weighed early this morning and took up swinging moorings off the Esplanade. She saluted the Governor General, which was returned by the fort.
  • Wednesday 20th Sailed H.M. Steam Vessels "AssuranceX
    HMS Assurance was a Royal Navy screw-propelled vessel in the Vigilant class, the name for a group of Second class despatch/gunvessels designed for inshore warfare duties during the Crimean War. The Admiralty ordered the ship on July 26, 1855. She was launched on March 13, 1856, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on April 16, 1856. She was 180 feet long, 28 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 14 feet. She was built for a company of eighty men. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The outbreak of the Russian War demonstrated the need for numerous manoeuvrable, shallow-draught vessels for coastal and inshore operations in the Baltic and Black Seas. Six small screw steamers of the Arrow class were approved in early 1854 to be built by contract in the Thames, initially classed as despatch vessels. Twenty further vessels, to two designs rated as First class (the six Intrepid class) and the Second class (the 14 Vigilant class) were ordered in 1855" (218). The Assurance was sold to sold to Marshall, Plymouth, on March 8, 1870.David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " and "PelorusX
    HMS Pelorus was a Royal Navy screw corvette with twenty-one guns in the Pearl class. She was launched on February 5, 1858 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on September 10, 1857. She was 200 feet long, 40 feet 4 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 23 feet 11 inches. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the 1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). HMS Pelorus was broken up for parts at Devonport on February 3, 1869. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " for RangoonX

    Rangoon is now known as Yangon

    .
  • Thursday 21st Arrived H.M.S.V. "MohawkX
    HMS Mohawk was a Royal Navy screw-propelled vessel in the Vigilant class, the name for a group of Second class despatch/gunvessels designed for inshore warfare duties during the Crimean War. The Admiralty ordered the ship on July 26, 1855. She was launched on January 11, 1856 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on March 23, 1856. She was 180 feet long, 28 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 14 feet. She was built for a company of 80 men. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The outbreak of the Russian War demonstrated the need for numerous manoeuvrable, shallow-draught vessels for coastal and inshore operations in the Baltic and Black Seas. Six small screw steamers of the Arrow class were approved in early 1854 to be built by contract in the Thames, initially classed as despatch vessels. Twenty further vessels, to two designs rated as First class (the six Intrepid class) and the Second class (the 14 Vigilant class) were ordered in 1855" (218). HMS Mohawk was sold to the Chinese Imperial Customs on September 20, 1862, renamed Peking and sailed in April of 1863 to join Sherard Osborn's 'Vampire Fleet' (208).David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " from TrincomaleeX

    Trincomalee is now known as Trincomalee

    having made a very quick passage of four days.
  • H.M.S. "HimalayaX
    The Himalaya was built by the P&O (Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company) and purchased by the Royal Navy to serve as a transport ship in 1854. When she was completed as a passenger liner for the P&O, she was the largest vessel in the world (244). She was 340 feet 5 inches long, 46 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 24 feet in the hold. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The advent of the Russian War in 1854 witnessed the first large-scale taking up of large merchant vessels to serve as auxiliaries, instead of the traditional practice of using elderly warships; the majority of these were iron-hulled screw ships, which gave the navy considerable experience of metal hulls prior to their wholesale adoption for large warships" (243). The Himalaya was sunk by German dive-bombers during a German air raid in 1940. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " is about to proceed to England having broken her main shaft, and being very leaky.
  • The "MohawkX
    HMS Mohawk was a Royal Navy screw-propelled vessel in the Vigilant class, the name for a group of Second class despatch/gunvessels designed for inshore warfare duties during the Crimean War. The Admiralty ordered the ship on July 26, 1855. She was launched on January 11, 1856 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on March 23, 1856. She was 180 feet long, 28 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 14 feet. She was built for a company of 80 men. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The outbreak of the Russian War demonstrated the need for numerous manoeuvrable, shallow-draught vessels for coastal and inshore operations in the Baltic and Black Seas. Six small screw steamers of the Arrow class were approved in early 1854 to be built by contract in the Thames, initially classed as despatch vessels. Twenty further vessels, to two designs rated as First class (the six Intrepid class) and the Second class (the 14 Vigilant class) were ordered in 1855" (218). HMS Mohawk was sold to the Chinese Imperial Customs on September 20, 1862, renamed Peking and sailed in April of 1863 to join Sherard Osborn's 'Vampire Fleet' (208).David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " is to go to RangoonX

    Rangoon is now known as Yangon

    to join the squadron there.

XThis article appears as the ninth contribution to issue 7 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "J."

It appears that since leaving TrincomaleeX

Trincomalee is now known as Trincomalee

, a great number of
XFrom McArthur's appendix: "Centipede was the name given to the lashing by which the men's blankets were strapped for Field Service."
have been produced on board, so much so that recently at Evening Quarters, each man was required to appear with a Centipede in his possession. We certainly should have thought that such noxious reptiles, and such unpleasant bedfellows would have been flung overboard at the earliest opportunity but learn with surprize that they are carefully retained, and will be coiled round each man's blanket in the event of a campaign on shore.

XThis conundrum appears as the second contribution to issue 7 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "J."

XThis rebus appears as the fifth contribution to issue 7 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to to "W."

Though rough may be our sailors "fare" Yet the tales of home we'll tell. And "well" we'll wish to the dear ones there As we think of our last "Farewell

XThis rebus appears as the fifth contribution to issue 7 in Bampfield's extracts, where it is entitled "conundrum" and both the question (When is an Angle like a ship-wrecked Mariner?) and answer (When it's a Rectangle) are included. No initials are supplied for this contribution.

  • 10. When it is a rect angle.
  • 11. Because he's quite down in the mouth and nearly going to blubber

XThis publication information is not included in Bampfield's extracts.

Published at the Office No. 1 Port St. ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
every Saturday
Saturday 23 Jan. 1858
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"The Young Idea"

"Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal

Saturday 30th January 1858

No. 8

XThis article appears as the first contribution to issue 9 in Bampfield's extracts (an entirely different edition) and is attributed to "B."

It is seldom that any great & unprecedented undertaking will meet with the complete success at the first trial: - the great engineering triumphs of the present century have mostly taught us to expect failure before we achieve success: the Thames Tunnel, the Eddystone Lighthouse, the Plymouth Breakwater, because novel & unexampled works, were therefore in the first instance unsuccessful.
It is therefore with no surprize that we heard recently either that the Atlantic Telegraph had failed in the first attempt to lay it down, or that the Great Eastern "refuses to move from the spot where it has been built. A second attempt was made to induce this monster of the deep, to take to its aquatic elements; but a second time, it resisted all arguments whether of force or persuasion.
A fair lady bestowed its name, and called it "Leviathan" but "Leviathan was as resolute as "Great Eastern" and still remained upon the shore. "Try again" must be the motto of the builders.
Again, we read in an other part of our news that "Big Ben,"-the huge Bell that is to swing in the Clock tower of the Palace of Westminster,-"Big Ben" is cracked, his metal was too thin, or his tongue was too thick, and he will now have to be broken up, and his makers must "Try again" before they bring their work to completion.
But all these failures, we say, might reasonably be expected; whenever we attempt anything great and noble and unprecedented, neither a first, nor a second, nor a third failure must daunt us. "Try again" must be our motto, and success will eventually crown our perseverance.
The "Atlantic Telegraph" shall yet exchange the thoughts of John Bull with those of View Page
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Brother Jonathan, "Big Ben" shall yet sound his notes of warning to the denizens of our Metropolis, "Leviathan" shall yet float on the waters, the glory and triumph of our Naval Architects, and the "Young Idea" shall gain the support and interest of all.

XThis article appears in the same position (second contribution to issue 8) in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "L."

Those who wish for a birds eye view of CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

, we would strongly recommend to ascend the the Ochterbury monumentX

the Ochterbury monument is now known as Ochterlony Monument

on the Esplanade.
They will be amply repaid for the labouring ascent of the dark winding staircase by the glorious view, which awaits them on emerging at the top. The whole city lies at their feet, spread out before their gaze like a vast map. The winding HooghlyX

Hooghly is now known as Hugli River

with its shipping; the Esplanade, with its mixed multitude of European carriages, palanquine-bearers, riders galloping over the turf, soldiers at their Canteen, and the swarms of dark natives, the handsome European houses, intermingled with the low, dingy-roofed bazaars of the natives, the spires of the Christian Churches, the Moslem mosque, the massive pile, the palace of the Governor General, the large tanks cut in the soil, human habitations interspersed with trees, extending to the verge of the horizon of this flat alluvial district, these are but a few, of the object that delight the eye.
It is not our wish to enter upon an elaborate description but simply to recommend others to attempt the same ascent, to look around for themselves, and to describe with more accurate pen or pencil the scene which we have attempted to de-pict.

XThis article does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

The Evening Mail
On Saturday (Nov.r 23rd) a third attempt was made to move this gigantic vessel, which we are happy to say was eminently successful, and resulted in the "Leviathan" being gradually lowered down the launching ways some 25 feet in a slow, and beautifully regular manner.
The whole distance was accomplished without any accident, or delay worth speaking of, and throughout the entire day the advance of the ship was regulated according as Mr. Brunel thought fit, with as much care and certainty, as if the vessel had been a little cutter, instead of a ponderous structure of iron weighing upwards of 12,000 tons

XThis article appears as the third contribution to issue 8 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.

Last Thursday week the 21st Inst. a special Thanksgiving service was held in St. Paul's CaView Page
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thedral, to return thanks for the relief of LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

.
As it was understood that most of the LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

people would be present the occasion presented too much interest for us to neglect witnessing it, and partaking in the ceremony.
Accordingly at 1/4 to 10 a.m. we left the ship and engaged a buggy at the landing place, into which four of us were speedily stowed: the driver took us through Fort William and we were thus enabled to take a cursory view of the interior.
Here we saw several of the native soldiers on guard without any arm save their ramrods, a significant token of the little trust that can be placed upon these men at the present crisis.
After leaving the fort we emerged upon the race course, the grand stand & swimming post suggesting to our minds the exciting scenes, which we had unfortunately missed witnessing, by not reaching this place at an earlier season.
It was not long now ere we arrived at the cathedral, although had it not been for a sharp look out kept on our driver, he would most probably have taken us out into the country, as he did not appear to understand perfectly where we were desirous of being driven to, and was taking a course very different to that we wished.
On entering the sacred edifice we found that we were very late, but yet managed to obtain seats, although the position was not good being behind the pulpit.
The interior of the building is spacious and airy; the seats are formed of a species of arm chair, thus portioning off to each one a fair space, and even crinoline must share the same as a gentleman of the most slender proportions and consequently no lady could appropriate to herself more room than would be found convenient to a next seat neighbour. We cannot say how the fair sex approve of this arrangement.
From the light roof, iron girders dropped, and joined frames of the same material, which ran from one side to the other; we supposed these are intended for the use of punkahs during the hot weather
Over the altar a fine large painted window, representing the Crucifixion, attracted our attention. The Pulpit, choir, Altar & reading Desks, were draped in black, and noticing that a large number of the congregation were also arrayed in the sable garments of mourning, we were painfully reView Page
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minded of the heartrending losses, and bloodshed, which have characterized late times.
From our position in the rear of the Preacher (Archdeacon PrattX

Archdeacon Pratt

From “Pratt, John Henry” by Anita McConnell in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: “Pratt, John Henry (bap. 1809, d. 1871), Church of England clergyman and mathematician, was baptized on 30 June 1809 at St Mary Woolnoth, London, one of two sons of Josiah Pratt (1768–1844), Church of England clergyman, and his wife, Elizabeth, formerly Jowett. He was educated at Oakham School, Rutland, and entered Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, in 1829, graduating BA in 1833 as third wrangler. He was elected to a fellowship, and proceeded MA in 1836. After taking orders he was appointed through the influence of Daniel Wilson, bishop of Calcutta, a chaplain of the East India Company in 1838. He became Wilson's domestic chaplain and in 1850 archdeacon of Calcutta.”
) we were unfortunately unable to hear his discourse fully, but its main design was to show the great mercy of Almighty God in thus relieving a people who had deemed themselves lost, and had made up their minds to die, as well as to teach us how grateful we should be for all His Mercies, and to put our trust in Him alone.
We heard the sounds of subdued sobs from the body of the church, and surely it was sufficient to drain tears of joy and gratitude from those who were so fresh from the scene of danger and distress.
We left the cathedral deeply impressed, with the solemnity, and applicability of the service we had witnessed.

    XThis article appears in the same position (as the fifth contribution to issue 8) in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.

  • 26th HMS "ChesapeakeX
    HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " left her swinging moorings off the Esplanade and moored off Baboo Ghant
    H.M.S. "MohawkX
    HMS Mohawk was a Royal Navy screw-propelled vessel in the Vigilant class, the name for a group of Second class despatch/gunvessels designed for inshore warfare duties during the Crimean War. The Admiralty ordered the ship on July 26, 1855. She was launched on January 11, 1856 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on March 23, 1856. She was 180 feet long, 28 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 14 feet. She was built for a company of 80 men. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The outbreak of the Russian War demonstrated the need for numerous manoeuvrable, shallow-draught vessels for coastal and inshore operations in the Baltic and Black Seas. Six small screw steamers of the Arrow class were approved in early 1854 to be built by contract in the Thames, initially classed as despatch vessels. Twenty further vessels, to two designs rated as First class (the six Intrepid class) and the Second class (the 14 Vigilant class) were ordered in 1855" (218). HMS Mohawk was sold to the Chinese Imperial Customs on September 20, 1862, renamed Peking and sailed in April of 1863 to join Sherard Osborn's 'Vampire Fleet' (208).David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " sailed for RangoonX

    Rangoon is now known as Yangon

  • 29th H.M.S. "PearlX
    HMS Pearl was a Royal Navy screw corvette with twenty-one guns in the Pearl class. She was launched on February 13, 1855 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on January 25, 1856. She was 200 feet long, 40 feet 4 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 23 feet 11 inches. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the 1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). HMS Pearl was sold to be broken up for parts at Charlton in 1884. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " hauled out into the stream.
  • 30th H.M.St.V. "SparrowhawkX
    HMS Sparrowhawk was a Royal Navy screw-propelled vessel in the Vigilant class, the name for a group of Second class despatch/gunvessels designed for inshore warfare duties during the Crimean War. The Admiralty ordered the ship on July 26, 1855. She was launched on February 9, 1856, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on April 7, 1856. She was 180 feet long, 28 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 14 feet. She was built for a company of eighty men. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The outbreak of the Russian War demonstrated the need for numerous manoeuvrable, shallow-draught vessels for coastal and inshore operations in the Baltic and Black Seas. Six small screw steamers of the Arrow class were approved in early 1854 to be built by contract in the Thames, initially classed as despatch vessels. Twenty further vessels, to two designs rated as First class (the six Intrepid class) and the Second class (the 14 Vigilant class) were ordered in 1855" (218). HMS Sparrowhawk was sold at Esquimault in 1872. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All The Ships of The Royal Navy 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " sailed this afternoon for RangoonX

    Rangoon is now known as Yangon

    , having completed her objects

XThis article appears as the fourth contribution to issue 8 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield does not supply the initials of the contributor.

  • Lieut.t Edw.d KellyX

    Lieutenant Edward Kelly

    Lieutenant Edward Kelly does not appear in the muster book of HMS Chesapeake. "Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
    (additional) took passage in H.M.S. "PelorusX
    HMS Pelorus was a Royal Navy screw corvette with twenty-one guns in the Pearl class. She was launched on February 5, 1858 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on September 10, 1857. She was 200 feet long, 40 feet 4 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 23 feet 11 inches. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the 1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). HMS Pelorus was broken up for parts at Devonport on February 3, 1869. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " to which ship he is lent to do duty until further orders.
  • Commander Shute B. PiersX

    S.B. Piers

    S. B. Piers, a commander, joined the Chesapeake on July 28, 1857. He was discharged on January 22, 1858, to serve aboard HMS Himalaya when Vice Captain Haswell was invalided."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
    to the "HimalayaX
    The Himalaya was built by the P&O (Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company) and purchased by the Royal Navy to serve as a transport ship in 1854. When she was completed as a passenger liner for the P&O, she was the largest vessel in the world (244). She was 340 feet 5 inches long, 46 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 24 feet in the hold. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The advent of the Russian War in 1854 witnessed the first large-scale taking up of large merchant vessels to serve as auxiliaries, instead of the traditional practice of using elderly warships; the majority of these were iron-hulled screw ships, which gave the navy considerable experience of metal hulls prior to their wholesale adoption for large warships" (243). The Himalaya was sunk by German dive-bombers during a German air raid in 1940. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " vice Captain HaswellX

    Haswell

    Haswell served aboard Himalaya until he was injured and replaced by Piers."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
    Invalided.
  • Charles I. BrownriggX

    Charles J. Brownrigg

    Charles J. Brownrigg, a mate (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on August 4th, 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster book."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
    Mate to be Lieutenant. The official intimation of this promotion has not been yet received, but as it is announced in the Gazette, we feel much pleasure in announcing it also. At the same time we must state that our pleasure is tinged with regret at losing so good a messmate.

XThe information in "Epitome" appears along with the information in "Naval Intelligence" as the fifth contribution to issue 8 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield attributes the contribution to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.

  • A Regatta is announced to come off on the 10th Prosc.s but we have not received any information as to the terms or arrangements
  • The Boats crews of H.M.S. ChesapeakeX
    HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    have been sent away every evening for half an hour, in order to get into training for the coming Regatta.
  • Cricket has been in vogue during the past week amongst our officers but there has not been any game worthy of being noted.
  • Leave is now granted to the crew of H.M.S. "ChesapeakeX
    HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " to visit the shore in certain proportions at a time. Several of those who have been allowed to go, have shown so little regard for liberty as to be imprisoned for the night.

XThis letter appears as the fourth contribution to issue 9 (an entirely different issue) in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "L."

To the Editor of the "Young Idea"
Dear Sir,
While walking the Deck by moonlight, in a contemplative mood, on Thursday Evening, two animals of the order "Rodentia," usually called "rats" were observed by the Quartermaster near the main mast. Being much troubled by the apparition, and having an intense aversion to anything in the shape of a rat, (except the rat-tat of the postman's knock) I hasten to inform you of the approach of these formidable foes. I sincerely hope, that our smart, though juvenile members of the feline tribe may now be duly trained and disciplined to meet the foe, and I doubt not that a whole host of asiatic rats will soon be made to fly before the sharp claws of a few brave British cats.
I am, Dear Sir,
Yours very truly
"Night Watch"

XOnly one of these conundrums (the one about "I") appears as the second contribution to issue 7 (an entirely different issue) in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield attributes the contribution to "J."

To answer your two riddles, Sir, I'll try:

XThis publication info appears as the sixth contribution to issue 8 in Bampfield's extracts.

Published at the Office No. 1 Port Street, "Chesapeake" every Saturday. Subscriptions most thankfully received
Saturday 30th January, 1858.
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"The Young Idea"

"Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal

Saturday 6th February 1858

No. 9

XThis article (with the first sentence excluded) appears as the first contribution to issue 8 (an entirely different issue) in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield attributes it to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.
In this short space of time we have seen much, done much, and heard much: already we miss the faces of one or two shipmates, and expect others to fill their places, and thus it ever is, and ever will be; -faces, and forms will change in the ever revolving diorama of a sailor's life
We have received our long looked for, eagerly anticipated letters, we have heard from those at home, at the very sight of whose handwriting, we have felt our breasts thrill with emotions of pleasure, and joy, and if such feelings are experienced by a mere knowledge of the characters of the address, we can readily fathom the happiness the glow of exultation, the interest with which we break the seal, and first with rapid glance devour the contents, abstracting the news greedily, in order to learn all in a moment.
Then comes the second reading, and now we ponder over every word, we digest every sentence, and carefully peruse every line, receiving fresh pleasure from every perusal, and being borne back in memory to our happy homes, where we can fancy we see
"++++++++" the light
"of household fires gleam warm & bright"
we fancy we can hear the joyous laugh of merry friends, the hearty gratulations of the season; we fancy we can feel the warm grasp of friendly recognition, the endearing embrace of parents, sisters, wives, or sweethearts; we read their wishes, their soul breathed View Page
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wishes for our happiness, and welfare; and as we close the pages which have expanded our hearts with more real enjoyment, than we have experienced since we parted from the oft remembered writers, we come back to the cold stern reality of distance, of our separation.
But, stop! We have only spoken of pleasure, as derived from the receipt of letters from our homes; there is yet another view of the matter, and, this, brings grief, in lieu of joy; tears, instead of smiles; and sorrow usurps the place of mirth.
Note! Some poor comrade receives a letter whose sable edges bespeak the contents; see! with what trembling hand, and bursting heart he retires into some corner, where in secret he can trace with tearful eyes, the lines which convey the sad intelligence of the death of some dear relative, or friend.
Tis thus that each mail must produce different emotions amongst a body of men, and while some are filled with joy, others are drooping with pain and trouble.
May we know little of this latter.

XThis article appears in the same position (second contribution to issue 9) in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield does not supply the contributor's initials.

As we believe that many of our readers have availed themselves of our recommendation last week to ascend the Monument on the Esplanade, we will venture to call attention in like manner to the beautiful LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

tigers which may be seen on the payment of one Rupee in Wood Street, Chowringhee.
They have been lately brought from LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

, where they formed a portion of the Royal Menagerie which the Kings of OudeX

Oude is now known as Ayodhya

have been in the habit of maintaining.
The first Tiger you see on entering is a beautiful creature most remarkable for its tameness. At LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

it had been brought up by hand, and led about with only a chain round its neck. It would allow little children to play with it in passing along the streets, and the people of LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

lamented when they saw it put into a cage, to be carried away.
There are 6 or 7 others, of which we recollect two particularly, one because of its ferocious growl, the only savage one, and the other as being the largest of all, and distinguished for the beauty of its stripes, which, it will be observed, are all double.
There is a leopard, which is rather too apt to put its paws through the cage, and a chetah View Page
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or hunting leopard, which is only confined by a chain, and seems perfectly tame, licking its keeper's hand, and making a gruff, purring, sound, like a cat with a sore throat.
There is also a fine Giraffe, perfectly tame, and we recommend visitors to beg the Sikh attendant to take a ride on its back. The man, though full sized, seems quite a pigmy when mounted on the tall quadruped; and we defy any one to keep himself from laughing, when the poor beast sets off at a canter.

XThis article appears as the first contribution to issue 10 (an entirely different issue) in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "L."

Our papers, and our Reviews, our periodicals, have all one absorbing topic, and that is India. Fresh details of the horrible sufferings which our countrymen & women underwent in the earlier part of the insurrection, further particulars of the movements of our gallant army, praises of those heroic spirits who have fought and perchance have fallen, before the gates of DelhiX

Delhi is now known as Delhi

, or within the walls of LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

, comments on the past misgovernment of the country, suggestions towards its better management for the future; these seem to form the staple of what we have received by our two last mails; pictorial papers take up the same subject, and views from india, and illustrations of Hindoo customs, now meet us in every page: when we open our Magazines, we find historical papers, tracing the rise of the British dominion in India, dissertations on the variety of races, or essays on the religious, and various forms of feeling which are to be found in this remarkable Asiatic Peninsula.
"We spared our readers," says the Times, "as much as we could the pain of revolting and horrible "images; we have no objection that they should know, that there are the most terrible details in the background of outrages perpetrated upon English men and English women."
"Christianity," writes the same paper in another article, "is not a religion to be propagated by violence, but it is essentially a religion to be diffused by preaching and teaching. Christians may not make converts by the sword, but they are bound, where they can, to make proselytes by instruction *** our administration in India, has presented the spectacle of one of the greatest Christian powers in the world sedulously bent upon ignoring its own belief.**** In future the religion of the dominant race must be plainly professed, instead of being timidly kept in the background, and the field be opened to missionary exertions with the sanction, instead of the disfavour, of the Government."
These sentiments, no doubt, express the feelings of the great majority of our friends in England, and we prefer giving them in the powerful words of the "Times," to endeavouring to clothe them in our own poor language.
It may be sufficient for us to rejoice that at such a time, we should have been sent in our floating home, to the very spot on which the eyes of the world, are turned; to see for ourselves something of those scenes which papers so fully describe to our friends at home, and perchance to take part in those transactions, which are yet destined to become matters of history.

XThis article appears as the ninth contribution to issue 9 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield does not supply an author's initial.

    XThis article appears in the same position (fifth contribution to issue 9), but it is called "Epitome" instead of "Naval Intelligence" in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield attributes the contribution to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.

  • 4th Feb. H.M.S. "HimalayaX
    The Himalaya was built by the P&O (Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company) and purchased by the Royal Navy to serve as a transport ship in 1854. When she was completed as a passenger liner for the P&O, she was the largest vessel in the world (244). She was 340 feet 5 inches long, 46 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 24 feet in the hold. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The advent of the Russian War in 1854 witnessed the first large-scale taking up of large merchant vessels to serve as auxiliaries, instead of the traditional practice of using elderly warships; the majority of these were iron-hulled screw ships, which gave the navy considerable experience of metal hulls prior to their wholesale adoption for large warships" (243). The Himalaya was sunk by German dive-bombers during a German air raid in 1940. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " hauled out into the stream, and is preparing for her departure for England. She will convey refugees from LucknowX

    Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

    ; and other places.
  • A working party under JW Worsley second master, have been employed onboard the "PearlX
    HMS Pearl was a Royal Navy screw corvette with twenty-one guns in the Pearl class. She was launched on February 13, 1855 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on January 25, 1856. She was 200 feet long, 40 feet 4 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 23 feet 11 inches. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the 1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). HMS Pearl was sold to be broken up for parts at Charlton in 1884. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " during the past week, stowing holds and provisioning her from the Barque "Oceanica"
  • The crew of H.M.S. "ChesapeakeX
    HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " have been employed turning in the rigging afresh and rattling down.
  • The mail steamer from China arrived this morning. By Advices from that part of the world, we learn of the storming of CantonX

    Canton is now known as Canton

    , and the capture of Commisioner YehX

    Commisioner Yeh

    From Deadly Dreams: "Ye Mingchen (1809-59). He became governor of Guangdong in 1847 and imperial commissioner for foreign affairs and concurrently governor-general of Guangdong and Guangxi in 1852. He was to be captured by the British during the Arrow War and exiled to India, where he starved himself to death" (6).J. Y. Wong, Deadly Dreams: Opium, Imperialism, and the Arrow War (1856–1860) in China (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 1998.
    , who is now on board the "Inflexible." Our loss was 118 killed, and wounded; amongst the former we regret to find the name of Capt. Bates of the "Actaeon," who was shot whilst pointing out the most desirable spot for planting a scaling ladder. We hope next week to be able to place before our readers, a more detailed account of the proceedings against the "celestials"

XThis article appears as the fifth contribution to issue 9 (along with the details included in "Naval Intelligence") in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield attributes it to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.

  • On Wednesday, our late Commander Capt Piers, was received at a farewell dinner in the Ward Room preparatory to his sailing in the "HimalayaX
    The Himalaya was built by the P&O (Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company) and purchased by the Royal Navy to serve as a transport ship in 1854. When she was completed as a passenger liner for the P&O, she was the largest vessel in the world (244). She was 340 feet 5 inches long, 46 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 24 feet in the hold. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The advent of the Russian War in 1854 witnessed the first large-scale taking up of large merchant vessels to serve as auxiliaries, instead of the traditional practice of using elderly warships; the majority of these were iron-hulled screw ships, which gave the navy considerable experience of metal hulls prior to their wholesale adoption for large warships" (243). The Himalaya was sunk by German dive-bombers during a German air raid in 1940. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    ". The entertainment was of a strictly private character, but the "ChesapeakeX
    HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " band was in attendance, and played a succession of airs, when the cloth was removed. "Auld Lang Syne" followed the proposal of the special toast of the day, namely, "The Health of Capt. Piers, & a prosperous voyage to the HimalayaX
    The Himalaya was built by the P&O (Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company) and purchased by the Royal Navy to serve as a transport ship in 1854. When she was completed as a passenger liner for the P&O, she was the largest vessel in the world (244). She was 340 feet 5 inches long, 46 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 24 feet in the hold. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The advent of the Russian War in 1854 witnessed the first large-scale taking up of large merchant vessels to serve as auxiliaries, instead of the traditional practice of using elderly warships; the majority of these were iron-hulled screw ships, which gave the navy considerable experience of metal hulls prior to their wholesale adoption for large warships" (243). The Himalaya was sunk by German dive-bombers during a German air raid in 1940. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    ."
  • The mail for England will start on Monday next the 8th Inst.
  • We have noticed some young sportsmen have been out with their fowling pieces, but very little success appears to have awarded their juvenile ardour.

XThis article appears as the sixth contribution to issue 9 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "B."

Take care of your rupees, and avoid the Billiard cues.

XThis letter appears as the seventh contribution to issue 9 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "J."

Dear Mr Editor"
Do give us more riddles this week, for tho' I could not for my life start one out of my own nozzle, yet I greatly enjoy puzzling over what others have started, and though I never wish to be riddled with shot, yet I always like to be peppered with riddles, and in fact the "Young Idea" seems quite imperfect without them.
So, believe me, Dear Mr. Editor
Your constant reader
"Puzzlehead"
Ed. our answer is given below

XThis rebus appears as the eighth contribution to issue 9 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "W."

When I was but a little boy I dearly loved my first so gayly decked, so neatly dressed so tenderly twas nursed.
With martial ardour next I sighed To go where Glory beckoned. I called myself a soldier lad And bravely beat my second
But now grown up to man's estate A sailor bold am I:- And here on the Equator's line All listlessly we lie.
The sails flap idly on the mast- My whole, My whole has caught us: Down with the screw, whirl round the fan, We'll Try what steam has taught us
My 7.8.12.4.10.12 oft is seen Floating light from the peaks of the ships of our Queen Without 4.5.8.3.10.2.3. no gun Is much use, Tho' perhaps it is better than none, My 2.3.6.2.3. a vegetable is Which schoolboys oft use when the pedagogue's phiz Betokens some 1.8.4.13. from his cane And they hope by its means to assuage the sharp pain Which tingles their hands, and brings forth their tears My 13.11.9. is a picture quite dread Of human depravity, his senses all dead, His mind over thrown, 'tis easy to trace. The 5.11.2.4. of his fall in his face Bloated, purpled, debauched & disgusting to all His bottle, his enemy, friend, all in all. But my whole tis composed of letters 18 And much does the Editor need it, I ween. He really must call all his reader to note, That altho' 'Young Ideas' have their very best vote, Yet he seldom gets more than the "populi vox" But he hopes that my whole will appear in his box.
What two letters of the alphabet will represent?
A Female name? Voidness? Decline? Goods? Vexation? Dress? & a sensation after a night of dissipation?

XThis publication information does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

Published at the office No. 1 Port Street, "Chesapeake" every Saturday. contributions thankfully received
Saturday 6 February, 1858.
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"The Young Idea"

"Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal

Saturday February 13 1858

No. 10

One great event at least, has been its chief characteristic, one day at least, called forth more interest than the others, we speak of the Regatta day, and the attendant entertainment onboard the "ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
."
Although on this important occasion, our men did not acquit themselves in the manner we had hoped, yet it is a source of deep gratification, to know that the reigning prize of the day, the acme of ambition, the "Prize Cup" was won by our men.
Elsewhere we shall find a detailed account of the circumstances which marked the day, which we must say could not have been finer or more agreeable, nor can we drop this subject without paying our tribute of admiration to the "fair sex," the bright colours of whose tasteful array, enlivened our decks, and gave the ship a holiday appearance,
Our news this week is somewhat general and extensive; we have news of the movements of the Naval Brigade and the probability of intelligence arriving soon of an attack upon LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

: from RangoonX

Rangoon is now known as Yangon

, accounts would lead us to believe that the disturbances there are not likely to be settled either quickly or quietly, as, by the CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

"Englishman" it is reported that Captain Beauchamp SeymourX

Seymour

From “Seymour, Frederick Beauchamp Paget, Baron Alcester” by by J. K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Seymour, Frederick Beauchamp Paget, Baron Alcester (1821–1895), naval officer, was born in London on 12 April 1821. He was the son of Colonel Sir Horace Beauchamp Seymour and his first wife, Elizabeth Malet, née Palk (d. 1827), daughter of Sir Lawrence Palk, bt; his grandfather was Lord Hugh Seymour, and his uncle Sir George Francis Seymour. He received his early education at Eton College, and entered the navy in January 1834. [...] In May 1855 [Seymour] was appointed to the floating battery Meteor, which he took out to the Crimea, and brought back to Portsmouth in the early summer of 1856. In July 1857 he commissioned the Pelorus, which he commanded for nearly six years on the Australian station. Between January and April 1858 the Pelorus provided a naval brigade in Burma, playing a vital role in preventing the spread of the mutiny from India. From 1860 to 1861 he commanded the naval brigade in New Zealand during the war there, for which he was made a CB on 16 July 1861."
has landed the crew of the "PelorusX
HMS Pelorus was a Royal Navy screw corvette with twenty-one guns in the Pearl class. She was launched on February 5, 1858 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on September 10, 1857. She was 200 feet long, 40 feet 4 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 23 feet 11 inches. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the 1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). HMS Pelorus was broken up for parts at Devonport on February 3, 1869. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
" with a view of forming a Naval Brigade, but we must not place implicit reliance upon this latter report, as it is as yet unauthenticated.
We can only hope that we shall not be excluded from a participation of whatever may take place in that quarter.

XThis letter appears as the third contribution to issue 9 (an entirely different issue) in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield attributes the contribution to "W."

Dear Sir,
The following account which was given me by a gentleman of CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

may perhaps, prove interesting View Page
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to the Readers of the "Young Idea"
An exploring party was recently sent from CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

to visit the Andaman IslandsX

Andaman Islands is now known as Andaman Islands

in the Bay of Bengal with the view of selecting a site to establish a penal colony, and to banish thither the captive King of DelhiX

Delhi is now known as Delhi

and his rebel Sepoys. It is remarkable that this group of Islands, tho' so near to the Asiatic Continent, are inhabited by a race of savages, no way akin to the Asiatic tribes, but apparently much nearer allied to the African Negroes. They live in a perfect state of nature, without the slightest vestige of a garment; their huts are mere dens or kennels under which they crawl at night; in fact they seem to be among the most degraded forms of humanity.
The first salutation our explorers received was a flight of arrows, but a few musket shots soon dispersed the natives. Two of them were killed, and one captured. This savage has been brought to CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

by Dr. ..... and both he and Mrs...... have done their best to humanize him by kind treatment. He was introduced to several Negroes of different tribes, but none of them could understand his language.
He shews himself not insensible to kindness, and was pleased with Dr. .....,'s little child, making signs, that he had a little child also. On one occasion, wishing to show his gratitude to Mrs. ..... & following the custom of his country on such occasions, he took the lady's hand within both his own, raised it solemnly to his lips, and with the deepest respect, spat into it.

XThis article appears as the fourth contribution to issue 10 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "J."

The consternation struck into the sepoys in Central India by the sight of our Bluejackets, is scarcely to be imagined. "They are not English "men" say the sepoys. "Nor men, at all, but sea-devils who have come up out of the sea to fight for the Englishmen They do not walk like men, but in a rolling way that shows they have claws upon their feet. They are dressed in a way quite different from Englishmen, they are not tall, but very broad, in fact they are about 5 feet high, by 4 feet broad; they can carry big guns on their shoulders, or under their arms; six of them can bring a gun up a hill, which it would take 200 or 300 sepoys to move at all; they never speak a word, and when they attack they can never be driven back; they are cannibals, and eat sepoys when they have salted them down, sepoy bullets cannot kill them."

XThis extract appears as the ninth contribution (a supplement) to issue 10. Bampfield attributes the contribution to J. Kavanagh, Esq.

"Opening of the Siege." The troops mutinied on the 30th of May and after the 30th of June the siege commenced in earnest. The constant din of artillery and musketry, combined with the yells of the demons without, and busy excitement within our defences, kept the women and children in dread of death.
Some sat patiently, others ran from room to room, thinking the shot pursued them, some cried and beat their chests, others dragged their children from one side of the room to the other, as the roar of the cannon disturbed them, some prayed as they had never prayed before, while others laughed at the fear & confusion of the rest.
"Relief of LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

by Genl.HavelockX

General Havelock

From “Havelock, Sir Henry” by James Lunt in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: “Havelock, Sir Henry (1795–1857), army officer, was born on Easter day, 5 April 1795, at Ford Hall, Bishopwearmouth, near Sunderland, second son of William Havelock (1757–1837), shipbuilder and shipowner, and Jane, daughter of John Carter, solicitor, of Stockton-on-Tees. [. . .] Henry was thrown on his own resources in 1814, having quarrelled with his father, but with his brother William's help, and against his father's wishes, he joined the army. William had already done so and had distinguished himself at Waterloo. Havelock joined the 95th foot (Rifle brigade) and was commissioned second lieutenant on 30 July 1815, spending the next eight years at home on garrison duties. He was fortunate to serve under Captain (later Major-General Sir) Harry Smith, a truly professional soldier, who encouraged Havelock to study his profession. He decided to try his fortunes in India (where his brothers William and Charles Frederick were already serving), but not before he had made intensive studies in Hindustani and Persian at the Oriental Institute; he then exchanged into the 13th foot (Somerset light infantry) which was under orders for India. He was now a lieutenant but dependent solely on his pay in an army ruled by purchase of promotion. He sailed for India on 3 January 1823 [. . .] On 20 June 1854 Havelock obtained his regimental lieutenant-colonelcy and brevet colonelcy. He had left his family in Bonn when he returned to India at the end of 1851. War with Persia was declared on 1 November 1856, and early in 1857 Havelock was given a brigade in a force commanded by Brigadier-General Sir James Outram, an officer of the East India Company. Havelock drew up the plan for the successful attack on Muhammarah, but the war petered out when a peace treaty was signed in Paris on 4 March 1857. Havelock then returned to India, arriving back in Bombay on 20 May to find that the Bengal native army had broken out into mutiny. Travel overland being unsafe, he took the first available ship for Calcutta but was wrecked off Ceylon. He eventually reached Calcutta via Madras on 17 June. He was at once given command of a column to be sent up-country to relieve Cawnpore where the garrison was besieged in makeshift entrenchments. Thereafter he was to support Sir Henry Lawrence who was under siege in the residency compound in Lucknow. Havelock's appointment was not universally approved in Calcutta, but as Lady Canning, wife of the governor-general, was to comment: General Havelock is not in fashion, but all the same we believe he will do well. No doubt he is fussy and tiresome, but his little, old, stiff figure looks as active and fit for use as if he were made of steel. (Pollock, 153) Havelock's force consisted of the 64th foot (North Staffords), four companies of the 78th highlanders (Seaforths), two companies of the 84th (York and Lancaster) regiment, and a detachment of the 1st Madras European fusiliers (an East India Company regiment), the balance of which was in Allahabad under Lieutenant-Colonel J. G. Neill. There was a scratch collection of gunners to serve the six guns, twenty assorted officers and civilians to form the few cavalry, and some native irregulars. In total the force amounted to fewer than 2000 all ranks. [. . .] The relief column entered Cawnpore on 17 July, too late to save the hard-pressed garrison or the women and children who had been butchered on the orders of the treacherous Nana Sahib. Lucknow must be the next objective, and on 25 July they crossed the flooded Ganges and set foot in Oudh. [. . .] The relieving force had to fight hard to reach the residency, which it did before it grew dark on 25 September. Outram had been wounded, though not seriously, and Neill was killed. Harry Havelock distinguished himself, but his left arm was broken. He was lucky to escape when the sepoys set about killing the convoy of wounded. He was to return later. Outram was put to bed in the residency, assuming the command the next day, and Havelock was taken to dinner by Mrs Inglis, wife of Colonel John Inglis who had commanded the beleaguered garrison after the death of Sir Henry Lawrence. Havelock had believed the garrison was running short of supplies and was surprised to sit down to a dinner of beef cutlets, with mock turtle soup and champagne. Lucknow had been relieved at a cost of 535 men killed and wounded. Carts for the evacuation of women, children, and wounded were impossible to obtain. It was clear that a retreat to Cawnpore would be a difficult, if not impossible, operation. Outram, with Havelock's agreement, decided to remain in the residency and reinforce its garrison. They knew that the newly arrived commander-in-chief, Sir Colin Campbell, was gathering together a substantial force for Lucknow's relief. It was a wise decision. Campbell finally arrived on 16 November after hard fighting. Outram and Havelock went to meet him and were greeted as ‘Sir James’ and ‘Sir Henry’, the first time Havelock learned that he had been made a KCB. There was also a letter from the duke of Cambridge telling Havelock he had been promoted major-general. This was wonderful news, but Havelock was daily growing weaker as a result of dysentery, added to the effects of six months' campaigning in a difficult climate. Nursed by Harry, one arm in a sling, and his faithful aide-de-camp Hargood, Havelock was quietly slipping away. At 9.30 a.m. on Monday, 24 November 1857, he finally did so, in the arms of his son, to whom his last words supposedly were, ‘Harry, see how a Christian can die’ (Pollock, 252). Campbell had already decided to evacuate the residency, leaving a substantial force under Outram at the Alambagh as a base for a future attack. By the day of Havelock's death the evacuation was virtually complete. They buried him in the garden of the Alambagh, under a mango tree on which Harry carved the letter ‘H’, and took careful measurements of the grave before smoothing it down. It is there to this day.”
". Sir James OutramX

Outram

From “Outram, Sir James (1803–1863)" in Encyclopedia Britannica: "English general, and one of the heroes of the Indian Mutiny, was the son of Benjamin Outram of Butterley Hall, Derbyshire, civil engineer, and was born on the 29th of January 1803. His father died in 1805, and his mother, a daughter of Dr James Anderson, the Scottish writer on agriculture, removed in 1810 to Aberdeenshire. From Udny school the boy went in 1818 to the Marischal College, Aberdeen; and in 1819 an Indian cadet ship was given him. [. . .] Appointed in 1857, with the rank of lieutenant-general, to command an expedition against Persia, he defeated the enemy with great slaughter at Khushab, and conducted the campaign with such rapid decision that peace was shortly afterwards concluded, his services being rewarded by the grand cross of the Bath. From Persia he was summoned in June to India, with the brief explanation — "We want all our best men here." It was said of him at this time that "a fox is a fool and a lion a coward by the side of Sir J. Outram." Immediately on his arrival in Calcutta he was appointed to command the two divisions of the Bengal army occupying the country from Calcutta to Cawnpore; and to the military control was also joined the commissioner ship of Oudh. Already the mutiny had assumed such proportions as to compel Havelock to fall back on Cawnpore, which he only held with difficulty, although a speedy advance was necessary to save the garrison at Lucknow. [. . .] After the capture of Lucknow he was gazetted lieutenant-general. In February 1858 he received the special thanks of both houses of parliament, and in the same year the dignity of baronet with an annuity of £1000."
and Genl.HavelockX

General Havelock

From “Havelock, Sir Henry” by James Lunt in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: “Havelock, Sir Henry (1795–1857), army officer, was born on Easter day, 5 April 1795, at Ford Hall, Bishopwearmouth, near Sunderland, second son of William Havelock (1757–1837), shipbuilder and shipowner, and Jane, daughter of John Carter, solicitor, of Stockton-on-Tees. [. . .] Henry was thrown on his own resources in 1814, having quarrelled with his father, but with his brother William's help, and against his father's wishes, he joined the army. William had already done so and had distinguished himself at Waterloo. Havelock joined the 95th foot (Rifle brigade) and was commissioned second lieutenant on 30 July 1815, spending the next eight years at home on garrison duties. He was fortunate to serve under Captain (later Major-General Sir) Harry Smith, a truly professional soldier, who encouraged Havelock to study his profession. He decided to try his fortunes in India (where his brothers William and Charles Frederick were already serving), but not before he had made intensive studies in Hindustani and Persian at the Oriental Institute; he then exchanged into the 13th foot (Somerset light infantry) which was under orders for India. He was now a lieutenant but dependent solely on his pay in an army ruled by purchase of promotion. He sailed for India on 3 January 1823 [. . .] On 20 June 1854 Havelock obtained his regimental lieutenant-colonelcy and brevet colonelcy. He had left his family in Bonn when he returned to India at the end of 1851. War with Persia was declared on 1 November 1856, and early in 1857 Havelock was given a brigade in a force commanded by Brigadier-General Sir James Outram, an officer of the East India Company. Havelock drew up the plan for the successful attack on Muhammarah, but the war petered out when a peace treaty was signed in Paris on 4 March 1857. Havelock then returned to India, arriving back in Bombay on 20 May to find that the Bengal native army had broken out into mutiny. Travel overland being unsafe, he took the first available ship for Calcutta but was wrecked off Ceylon. He eventually reached Calcutta via Madras on 17 June. He was at once given command of a column to be sent up-country to relieve Cawnpore where the garrison was besieged in makeshift entrenchments. Thereafter he was to support Sir Henry Lawrence who was under siege in the residency compound in Lucknow. Havelock's appointment was not universally approved in Calcutta, but as Lady Canning, wife of the governor-general, was to comment: General Havelock is not in fashion, but all the same we believe he will do well. No doubt he is fussy and tiresome, but his little, old, stiff figure looks as active and fit for use as if he were made of steel. (Pollock, 153) Havelock's force consisted of the 64th foot (North Staffords), four companies of the 78th highlanders (Seaforths), two companies of the 84th (York and Lancaster) regiment, and a detachment of the 1st Madras European fusiliers (an East India Company regiment), the balance of which was in Allahabad under Lieutenant-Colonel J. G. Neill. There was a scratch collection of gunners to serve the six guns, twenty assorted officers and civilians to form the few cavalry, and some native irregulars. In total the force amounted to fewer than 2000 all ranks. [. . .] The relief column entered Cawnpore on 17 July, too late to save the hard-pressed garrison or the women and children who had been butchered on the orders of the treacherous Nana Sahib. Lucknow must be the next objective, and on 25 July they crossed the flooded Ganges and set foot in Oudh. [. . .] The relieving force had to fight hard to reach the residency, which it did before it grew dark on 25 September. Outram had been wounded, though not seriously, and Neill was killed. Harry Havelock distinguished himself, but his left arm was broken. He was lucky to escape when the sepoys set about killing the convoy of wounded. He was to return later. Outram was put to bed in the residency, assuming the command the next day, and Havelock was taken to dinner by Mrs Inglis, wife of Colonel John Inglis who had commanded the beleaguered garrison after the death of Sir Henry Lawrence. Havelock had believed the garrison was running short of supplies and was surprised to sit down to a dinner of beef cutlets, with mock turtle soup and champagne. Lucknow had been relieved at a cost of 535 men killed and wounded. Carts for the evacuation of women, children, and wounded were impossible to obtain. It was clear that a retreat to Cawnpore would be a difficult, if not impossible, operation. Outram, with Havelock's agreement, decided to remain in the residency and reinforce its garrison. They knew that the newly arrived commander-in-chief, Sir Colin Campbell, was gathering together a substantial force for Lucknow's relief. It was a wise decision. Campbell finally arrived on 16 November after hard fighting. Outram and Havelock went to meet him and were greeted as ‘Sir James’ and ‘Sir Henry’, the first time Havelock learned that he had been made a KCB. There was also a letter from the duke of Cambridge telling Havelock he had been promoted major-general. This was wonderful news, but Havelock was daily growing weaker as a result of dysentery, added to the effects of six months' campaigning in a difficult climate. Nursed by Harry, one arm in a sling, and his faithful aide-de-camp Hargood, Havelock was quietly slipping away. At 9.30 a.m. on Monday, 24 November 1857, he finally did so, in the arms of his son, to whom his last words supposedly were, ‘Harry, see how a Christian can die’ (Pollock, 252). Campbell had already decided to evacuate the residency, leaving a substantial force under Outram at the Alambagh as a base for a future attack. By the day of Havelock's death the evacuation was virtually complete. They buried him in the garden of the Alambagh, under a mango tree on which Harry carved the letter ‘H’, and took careful measurements of the grave before smoothing it down. It is there to this day.”
came on the 25th September, and we saw the vast crowns going out of the city to oppose that brave little force for three days we heard the firing of artillery coming closer and closer; On the last day there was a great stir, detachments of the enemy in retreat passed by; onwards came the British Troops, driving the cowards in terror before them. Elephants, camels, carts, horses, bullocks, and men made in masses for the bridge of boats over the GoomteeX

Goomtee is now known as Gomati River

. They crowded on to it, and it broke, sending some to the bottom of the stream, and the rest running up and down the banks in a panic. About 8 o'clock in the Evening we saw Sir J OutramX

Outram

From “Outram, Sir James (1803–1863)" in Encyclopedia Britannica: "English general, and one of the heroes of the Indian Mutiny, was the son of Benjamin Outram of Butterley Hall, Derbyshire, civil engineer, and was born on the 29th of January 1803. His father died in 1805, and his mother, a daughter of Dr James Anderson, the Scottish writer on agriculture, removed in 1810 to Aberdeenshire. From Udny school the boy went in 1818 to the Marischal College, Aberdeen; and in 1819 an Indian cadet ship was given him. [. . .] Appointed in 1857, with the rank of lieutenant-general, to command an expedition against Persia, he defeated the enemy with great slaughter at Khushab, and conducted the campaign with such rapid decision that peace was shortly afterwards concluded, his services being rewarded by the grand cross of the Bath. From Persia he was summoned in June to India, with the brief explanation — "We want all our best men here." It was said of him at this time that "a fox is a fool and a lion a coward by the side of Sir J. Outram." Immediately on his arrival in Calcutta he was appointed to command the two divisions of the Bengal army occupying the country from Calcutta to Cawnpore; and to the military control was also joined the commissioner ship of Oudh. Already the mutiny had assumed such proportions as to compel Havelock to fall back on Cawnpore, which he only held with difficulty, although a speedy advance was necessary to save the garrison at Lucknow. [. . .] After the capture of Lucknow he was gazetted lieutenant-general. In February 1858 he received the special thanks of both houses of parliament, and in the same year the dignity of baronet with an annuity of £1000."
and General HavelockX

General Havelock

From “Havelock, Sir Henry” by James Lunt in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: “Havelock, Sir Henry (1795–1857), army officer, was born on Easter day, 5 April 1795, at Ford Hall, Bishopwearmouth, near Sunderland, second son of William Havelock (1757–1837), shipbuilder and shipowner, and Jane, daughter of John Carter, solicitor, of Stockton-on-Tees. [. . .] Henry was thrown on his own resources in 1814, having quarrelled with his father, but with his brother William's help, and against his father's wishes, he joined the army. William had already done so and had distinguished himself at Waterloo. Havelock joined the 95th foot (Rifle brigade) and was commissioned second lieutenant on 30 July 1815, spending the next eight years at home on garrison duties. He was fortunate to serve under Captain (later Major-General Sir) Harry Smith, a truly professional soldier, who encouraged Havelock to study his profession. He decided to try his fortunes in India (where his brothers William and Charles Frederick were already serving), but not before he had made intensive studies in Hindustani and Persian at the Oriental Institute; he then exchanged into the 13th foot (Somerset light infantry) which was under orders for India. He was now a lieutenant but dependent solely on his pay in an army ruled by purchase of promotion. He sailed for India on 3 January 1823 [. . .] On 20 June 1854 Havelock obtained his regimental lieutenant-colonelcy and brevet colonelcy. He had left his family in Bonn when he returned to India at the end of 1851. War with Persia was declared on 1 November 1856, and early in 1857 Havelock was given a brigade in a force commanded by Brigadier-General Sir James Outram, an officer of the East India Company. Havelock drew up the plan for the successful attack on Muhammarah, but the war petered out when a peace treaty was signed in Paris on 4 March 1857. Havelock then returned to India, arriving back in Bombay on 20 May to find that the Bengal native army had broken out into mutiny. Travel overland being unsafe, he took the first available ship for Calcutta but was wrecked off Ceylon. He eventually reached Calcutta via Madras on 17 June. He was at once given command of a column to be sent up-country to relieve Cawnpore where the garrison was besieged in makeshift entrenchments. Thereafter he was to support Sir Henry Lawrence who was under siege in the residency compound in Lucknow. Havelock's appointment was not universally approved in Calcutta, but as Lady Canning, wife of the governor-general, was to comment: General Havelock is not in fashion, but all the same we believe he will do well. No doubt he is fussy and tiresome, but his little, old, stiff figure looks as active and fit for use as if he were made of steel. (Pollock, 153) Havelock's force consisted of the 64th foot (North Staffords), four companies of the 78th highlanders (Seaforths), two companies of the 84th (York and Lancaster) regiment, and a detachment of the 1st Madras European fusiliers (an East India Company regiment), the balance of which was in Allahabad under Lieutenant-Colonel J. G. Neill. There was a scratch collection of gunners to serve the six guns, twenty assorted officers and civilians to form the few cavalry, and some native irregulars. In total the force amounted to fewer than 2000 all ranks. [. . .] The relief column entered Cawnpore on 17 July, too late to save the hard-pressed garrison or the women and children who had been butchered on the orders of the treacherous Nana Sahib. Lucknow must be the next objective, and on 25 July they crossed the flooded Ganges and set foot in Oudh. [. . .] The relieving force had to fight hard to reach the residency, which it did before it grew dark on 25 September. Outram had been wounded, though not seriously, and Neill was killed. Harry Havelock distinguished himself, but his left arm was broken. He was lucky to escape when the sepoys set about killing the convoy of wounded. He was to return later. Outram was put to bed in the residency, assuming the command the next day, and Havelock was taken to dinner by Mrs Inglis, wife of Colonel John Inglis who had commanded the beleaguered garrison after the death of Sir Henry Lawrence. Havelock had believed the garrison was running short of supplies and was surprised to sit down to a dinner of beef cutlets, with mock turtle soup and champagne. Lucknow had been relieved at a cost of 535 men killed and wounded. Carts for the evacuation of women, children, and wounded were impossible to obtain. It was clear that a retreat to Cawnpore would be a difficult, if not impossible, operation. Outram, with Havelock's agreement, decided to remain in the residency and reinforce its garrison. They knew that the newly arrived commander-in-chief, Sir Colin Campbell, was gathering together a substantial force for Lucknow's relief. It was a wise decision. Campbell finally arrived on 16 November after hard fighting. Outram and Havelock went to meet him and were greeted as ‘Sir James’ and ‘Sir Henry’, the first time Havelock learned that he had been made a KCB. There was also a letter from the duke of Cambridge telling Havelock he had been promoted major-general. This was wonderful news, but Havelock was daily growing weaker as a result of dysentery, added to the effects of six months' campaigning in a difficult climate. Nursed by Harry, one arm in a sling, and his faithful aide-de-camp Hargood, Havelock was quietly slipping away. At 9.30 a.m. on Monday, 24 November 1857, he finally did so, in the arms of his son, to whom his last words supposedly were, ‘Harry, see how a Christian can die’ (Pollock, 252). Campbell had already decided to evacuate the residency, leaving a substantial force under Outram at the Alambagh as a base for a future attack. By the day of Havelock's death the evacuation was virtually complete. They buried him in the garden of the Alambagh, under a mango tree on which Harry carved the letter ‘H’, and took careful measurements of the grave before smoothing it down. It is there to this day.”
and staff enter the street facing us, leading the 78th Highlanders & Ferozepore Regiment of sikhs. Instantaneously the entrenchments shook with Hurrahs: they could not hear us, but we went on increasing our noisy joy, and shaking handkerchiefs and caps as they neared the Gate; The sight of that gallant little band, piercing thro' thousands to our rescue, affected many of us to tears. Such devotion!!! Such bravery!!!
"Adventure in the Mines". The enemy were detected mining towards us, as on the previous occasion, and I lay a long time waiting for View Page
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them to break into our gallery. we were suddenly confronted by a strong blow of the Miner's hoe, which brought down the slip of earth dividing us. The man spread out his arms & screamed as I put the muzzle of my pistol to his breast, and shot him. There was a great noise at the top of the shaft; and they called to each other to go, and bring out the dying miner, and his tools. A Sepoy leapt swearing to the bottom; I shot him in the stomach, in the act of firing at me: the commotion now became louder, and the rebels blustered & swore, as if they were all coming down. I taunted them with cowardice, and they, thinking I was a sikh, upbraided me with associating with "[indecipherable]" who eat cow's meat and other abominations.
I told them I was an European Officer, when they ceased their noise, and listened civilly to me. I asked why had they mutinied? They replied, they were fighting for their religion. "How have we threatened your religion? By giving us greased cartridges. *********
They were now desired by the Havildar, or Native Officer to fire at me, but they refused, saying they wanted to hear the Sahib speak." I challenged the Havildar to come down himself, and then said I would bring him some woman's apparel, this retort caused him to swear, and the others to laugh at him. They now commenced filling up the shaft, and I retired to my own gallery.
"Escaping in disguise". On the 9th November I sought out the spy Kunrigee Lall who - was going back with despatches to Sir Colin CampbellX

Sir Colin Campbell

From “Campbell [formerly Macliver], Colin, Baron Clyde” by H. M. Stephens, rev. Roger T. Stearn, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Campbell [formerly Macliver], Colin, Baron Clyde (1792–1863), army officer, born Macliver, the eldest son of John Macliver (d. 22 December 1858, aged ninety-two), a carpenter in Glasgow—whose father's Ardnave estate was forfeited following the Jacobite rising of 1745—and his wife, Agnes, née Campbell, of the Campbells of Islay, was born at John Street, Glasgow, on 20 October 1792. His mother died when he was a boy, and her brother, Colonel John Campbell, paid for Colin's education. He attended Glasgow grammar school and Gosport military academy. In 1807 Colonel Campbell took him to the duke of York as candidate for a commission. The duke assumed he was ‘another of the clan’ and his name was entered as Campbell, which he thenceforth used. [. . .] In March 1857 Campbell was offered command of the expedition then forming for China, which he refused. On 11 July arrived the news of the outbreak of the Indian mutiny and the death of General Anson, the commander-in-chief in India. That day Lord Panmure offered Campbell the command-in-chief. He accepted, and started next day for India. He arrived at Calcutta in August, and heard at once the news of the recovery of Delhi by Major-General Archdale Wilson, and of Havelock's capture of Cawnpore, and his preparations for the first relief of Lucknow. Campbell hurried to Cawnpore the troops intended for the China expedition, which Lord Elgin had wisely sent to Calcutta, and assembled there also picked troops from the army which had taken Delhi. After two months of hard work organizing the troops and clearing Lower Bengal, he took command of the army at the Alambagh, and, leaving General C. A. Windham to hold Cawnpore, started on 9 November with 4700 men and 32 guns to save the British (under Outram and Havelock) at Lucknow. His force, largely European troops—and including the 93rd and Captain William Peel's naval brigade—reached Lucknow, stormed the sikandarabagh (16 November), then broke through to Outram and Havelock in the residency. Campbell evacuated the Lucknow garrison and its many dependents (11–23 November), leaving a force under Outram holding the Alambagh, 3 miles south of Lucknow. On 30 November Campbell reached Cawnpore and sent the rescued on steamers to Calcutta. [. . .] Campbell decided that a thorough defeat of the mutineers in Oudh must be the first major step towards re-establishing British rule. By March 1858 he had assembled 25,000 men for this purpose, and then began his campaign. After ten days' hard fighting he finally recaptured Lucknow on 19 March, and then by a series of operations in Oudh and Rohilkhand pacified—with the usual executions and reprisals—the north of India by May. He then paused in his own personal exertions from ill health; but it was because of his careful organization that Sir Hugh Rose was able to muster an adequate army for the campaign in central India, and because of his planning that the campaign was finally successful. In India grand strategy was decided, partly on political grounds, by Lord Canning, the governor-general. [. . .] Campbell made some mistakes: for example, his preventing Outram cutting off the mutineers' retreat after their defeat at Lucknow in March 1858, and his appointment of the notoriously bungling Brigadier-General R. Walpole to command in Rohilkhand. Nevertheless, overall Campbell was a successful commander. The mutiny further enhanced his reputation, and also enriched him by prize money. On 14 May 1858 he was promoted general; on 15 January 1858 he was made colonel of his favourite 93rd highlanders. In late 1858 and early 1859 there was indiscipline among the East India Company's European troops over their transfer to the queen's service. Campbell sympathized with their grievances and advised concession and that the men ‘be liberally dealt with’. [. . .] In June 1861, on the foundation of the order, he was appointed a knight companion of the Order of the Star of India, and on 3 July 1858 he was made Baron Clyde of Clydesdale. His health was failing, and so on 4 June 1860 he left India."
and imparted to him my desire to venture in disguise in his company My attire was soon completed; I was dressed as a Budmash, or Irregular soldier of the city, with sword and shield, native made shoes, tight trousers, a yellow silk koortah over a close fitting white muslin shirt, a yellow coloured chintz sheet thrown round my shoulders, a cream coloured turban, and a white waistband or "Kummerbund", My face and neck down to the shoulders, and my hands to the wrists, were coloured with lampblack, the cork used being dipped in oil to cause the colour to adhere. After being provided with a small double barrelled pistol, and a pair of broad pyjamahs over the tight trousers, I proceeded with Kunrigee Lall to the banks of the river GoomteeX

river Goomtee is now known as Gomati River

. We undressed and quickly forded the river, which was about 4 1/2 ft. deep, and about 100 yards wide at this point. My courage failed me while in the water, and if my guide had been within reach, I should perhaps have pulled him back and abandoned the enterprize **** With my [indecipherable] resting on my shoulder, we advanced among the huts in front, where I accosted a matchlock man, "The night is cold"; he answered to my remark "It is very cold"*** We passed unnoticed thro' a number of Sepoys and matchlock men, some of whom, were escorting persons of rank in palanquins, preceded by torches. I jostled against several armed men in the street, but was not spoken to. **** I was in great spirits when we reached the green fields, into which I had not been for five months Everything around us smelt sweet, and a carrot I took from the roadside, was, the most delicious I ever tasted. I gave vent to my feelings in a conversation with Kenrigee Lall, who joined in my admiration of the province of OudhX

Oudh is now known as Ayodhya

, and lamented that it was now in the hands of wretches, whose misgovernment and rapacity was ruining it.
"Arrival at the British Camp". By 3 o'clock in the morning we arrived at a grove of mango trees, in which a man was singing at the top of his voice! He was alarmed at hearing us approach, and astonished us also, by calling out a guard of 25 Sepoys, all of whom asked questions. Kunrigee Lall lost heart for the first time, and threw away the letter entrusted to him for Sir Colin CampbellX

Sir Colin Campbell

From “Campbell [formerly Macliver], Colin, Baron Clyde” by H. M. Stephens, rev. Roger T. Stearn, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Campbell [formerly Macliver], Colin, Baron Clyde (1792–1863), army officer, born Macliver, the eldest son of John Macliver (d. 22 December 1858, aged ninety-two), a carpenter in Glasgow—whose father's Ardnave estate was forfeited following the Jacobite rising of 1745—and his wife, Agnes, née Campbell, of the Campbells of Islay, was born at John Street, Glasgow, on 20 October 1792. His mother died when he was a boy, and her brother, Colonel John Campbell, paid for Colin's education. He attended Glasgow grammar school and Gosport military academy. In 1807 Colonel Campbell took him to the duke of York as candidate for a commission. The duke assumed he was ‘another of the clan’ and his name was entered as Campbell, which he thenceforth used. [. . .] In March 1857 Campbell was offered command of the expedition then forming for China, which he refused. On 11 July arrived the news of the outbreak of the Indian mutiny and the death of General Anson, the commander-in-chief in India. That day Lord Panmure offered Campbell the command-in-chief. He accepted, and started next day for India. He arrived at Calcutta in August, and heard at once the news of the recovery of Delhi by Major-General Archdale Wilson, and of Havelock's capture of Cawnpore, and his preparations for the first relief of Lucknow. Campbell hurried to Cawnpore the troops intended for the China expedition, which Lord Elgin had wisely sent to Calcutta, and assembled there also picked troops from the army which had taken Delhi. After two months of hard work organizing the troops and clearing Lower Bengal, he took command of the army at the Alambagh, and, leaving General C. A. Windham to hold Cawnpore, started on 9 November with 4700 men and 32 guns to save the British (under Outram and Havelock) at Lucknow. His force, largely European troops—and including the 93rd and Captain William Peel's naval brigade—reached Lucknow, stormed the sikandarabagh (16 November), then broke through to Outram and Havelock in the residency. Campbell evacuated the Lucknow garrison and its many dependents (11–23 November), leaving a force under Outram holding the Alambagh, 3 miles south of Lucknow. On 30 November Campbell reached Cawnpore and sent the rescued on steamers to Calcutta. [. . .] Campbell decided that a thorough defeat of the mutineers in Oudh must be the first major step towards re-establishing British rule. By March 1858 he had assembled 25,000 men for this purpose, and then began his campaign. After ten days' hard fighting he finally recaptured Lucknow on 19 March, and then by a series of operations in Oudh and Rohilkhand pacified—with the usual executions and reprisals—the north of India by May. He then paused in his own personal exertions from ill health; but it was because of his careful organization that Sir Hugh Rose was able to muster an adequate army for the campaign in central India, and because of his planning that the campaign was finally successful. In India grand strategy was decided, partly on political grounds, by Lord Canning, the governor-general. [. . .] Campbell made some mistakes: for example, his preventing Outram cutting off the mutineers' retreat after their defeat at Lucknow in March 1858, and his appointment of the notoriously bungling Brigadier-General R. Walpole to command in Rohilkhand. Nevertheless, overall Campbell was a successful commander. The mutiny further enhanced his reputation, and also enriched him by prize money. On 14 May 1858 he was promoted general; on 15 January 1858 he was made colonel of his favourite 93rd highlanders. In late 1858 and early 1859 there was indiscipline among the East India Company's European troops over their transfer to the queen's service. Campbell sympathized with their grievances and advised concession and that the men ‘be liberally dealt with’. [. . .] In June 1861, on the foundation of the order, he was appointed a knight companion of the Order of the Star of India, and on 3 July 1858 he was made Baron Clyde of Clydesdale. His health was failing, and so on 4 June 1860 he left India."
I kept mine safe in my turban. We satisfied the guard that we were poor men travelling to Umrona, and they told us the road.***
It was near 4 o'clock in the morning when we heard the English challenge "Who comes there?" We had reached a British cavalry outpost. My eyes filled with joyful tears, and I thanked God for having safely conducted one through this dangerous enterprize.

XThis regatta report appears as the third contribution to issue 10 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.

XThis regatta report appears as the third contribution to issue 10 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.

The CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

Regatta of this season took place on Wednesday last the 10th Ist. & went off very successfully, under the patronage of Commodore WatsonX

Commodore Rundle Burges Watson

From “Watson, Rundle Burges” by by J. K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Watson, Rundle Burges (1809–1860), naval officer, was the eldest son of Captain Joshua Rowley Watson (1772–1810). He entered the navy in November 1821, and was promoted lieutenant on 7 October 1829. [. . .] On 23 December 1842 he was advanced to post rank, and on 24 December was made a CB. [. . .] In December 1852 [Watson] was appointed to the new steam frigate Impérieuse (50 guns), then, and for some years later, considered one of the finest ships in the navy. In 1854 she was sent into the Baltic in advance of the fleet, Watson being senior officer of the squadron of small vessels appointed to watch the breaking up of the ice, and to see that no Russian warships got to sea. It was an arduous service well performed. The Impérieuse continued with the flying squadron in the Baltic during the campaigns of 1854 and 1855, and until the signing of peace in March 1856. As the senior officer of the frigate squadron, and generally on detached service, Watson demonstrated the highest standards of seamanship, judgement, and leadership. After the peace the Impérieuse was sent to the North American station; she returned to England and was paid off early in 1857. From May 1856 until his death Watson was naval aide-de-camp to the queen. In June 1859 he was appointed captain-superintendent of Sheerness Dockyard, where he died on 5 July 1860. An officer of great ability, Watson was one of the last great sailing-ship captains, and the first frigate captain of the steam era."
, C.B. & the Officers of the Royal Navy, as also the Judges of the Supreme Court. The Judges on the occasion were Lieutt.Woodman R.N. Capt. Hill Master attendant, & Capt Lovell P.&O. Compy. These gentlemen were onboard the H.C.'s steamer "ProserpineX
The Proserpine was a gunboat (with two guns) built by John Laird, Sons & Co., Birkenhead, for the East India Company's marine service (181). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
" which lay off Baboo's Ghant. Visitors speedily arrived of whom we may safely say the "gentler sex" were the most numerous, and our bridge presented a brilliant spectacle when all the ladies had taken their stations thereon. The scene all round was now most enlivening, the "ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
" & ProserpineX
The Proserpine was a gunboat (with two guns) built by John Laird, Sons & Co., Birkenhead, for the East India Company's marine service (181). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
both gaily dressed in flags, the lines of boats filled with well dressed spectators, stretching along the Watery Race-View Page
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course, and the Ghant and its neighbourhood thickly lined with people of all classes. The "ProserpineX
The Proserpine was a gunboat (with two guns) built by John Laird, Sons & Co., Birkenhead, for the East India Company's marine service (181). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
" was the starting point and from this the boats proceeded downwards round certain buoys marked with flags and then came up again passing on the shore side of the "ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
" back to the "ProserpineX
The Proserpine was a gunboat (with two guns) built by John Laird, Sons & Co., Birkenhead, for the East India Company's marine service (181). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
". The whole distance to be pulled being about a mile and a half.

1st Race. Ships Gigs 6 oars 1st Prize 100 Rs. 2nd Prize 50 Rs. 3rd prize save entrance.

Minna Green 1
Sesostris Blue, White Ball 2
Semiramis Red & White 3
Sesostris came in first but having taken the wrong course Minna was adjudged the winner

2nd Race. Ships Gigs 4 oars. 1st Prize 100 Rs. 2nd Prize 50 Rs. 3rd Prize save entrance.

Bella Blue. White Ball 1
Judith American Flag 2
Liverpool White Blue star 3
The American boat which was pulled by Negroes came in a good second
The Following also started Hurkaru, Megoera, Defiance, Undaunted Jas Hurtley Proserpone and Griffin.

3rd Race Racing Gigs 6 Oars. 1st Prize Cup 300 Rs 2nd Prize 100 Rs. 4rd Prize save entrance.

Coquette Pink 1
White Gauntlet Blue. White Glove 2
Fiery Cross Blue Burgee. White Cross 3
The following also started Lotus. True Blue & Will o' Wisp. There was a close struggle between Coquette and White Gauntlet. White Gauntlet came in first, but as she had fowled, "Coquette" was adjudged the winner. The start was bad, and True Blue had an oar broken. Fiery Cross. Which was pulled by Chinese made great play at first, but lost way by coming across a cargo boat.

4th Race Double lanked ship's cutters. 8.10 & 12 Oars

1st Prize 100 Rs. 2nd Prize 50 Rs. 3rd Prize save entrance.

Semiramis Red & White 1
ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
Barge
Blue 2
ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
2d Cutter
White 3
The following also started ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
1st Cutter, and Brenda the latter boat being manned by marines from the "ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
" Immediately on Semiramis passing the winning point, one of the oarsmen (who had evidently made up his mind that his boat was to win) struck up a tune of triumph on the bagpipes, much to the amusement of the spectators.

5th Race. Launches. 14 to 18 oars. 1st Prize 100Rs 2d Prize. save entrance.

PyladesX
HMS Pylades was a Royal Navy First class Corvette with twenty-one guns, the only vessel in the Pylades class. The Admiralty ordered the ship on December 24, 1852. She was launched on November 23, 1854 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on March 29, 1855. The length of the gundeck was 192 feet and 9 inches, the breadth at the broadest part of the ship was 38 feet, and the depth in the hold was 23 feet and 11 inches. It is unclear how many men served on Pylades class vessels, but Jason class vessels (also 21-gun Corvettes) carried 240 men (210). As David Lyon and Rif Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the 1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional frigate role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). The Pylades was broken up for parts on January 23, 1875 (208). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All The Ships of The Royal Navy 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
Green 1
ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
1st launch
Red 2
The following also started. ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
's 2d Launch & Pinnace

6th Race Covered Pancies. 1st Prize 30 Rs. 2d Prize 10 Rs

Agul Parah Red, Black Stripe 1
Nonsuch Blue. White anchor 2
The following also started. Hela. Mela. Kalee and Arrow

7th Race. Dinghee Race for all comers

1st Prize 10Rs.
2d Prize 8Rs.
3d Prize 5Rs.
Six dinghees started of which only three arrived at the winning point, after a smartly contested race
The Race for screw steamers did not come off, as was announced in the programme.
Commodore WatsonX

Commodore Rundle Burges Watson

From “Watson, Rundle Burges” by by J. K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Watson, Rundle Burges (1809–1860), naval officer, was the eldest son of Captain Joshua Rowley Watson (1772–1810). He entered the navy in November 1821, and was promoted lieutenant on 7 October 1829. [. . .] On 23 December 1842 he was advanced to post rank, and on 24 December was made a CB. [. . .] In December 1852 [Watson] was appointed to the new steam frigate Impérieuse (50 guns), then, and for some years later, considered one of the finest ships in the navy. In 1854 she was sent into the Baltic in advance of the fleet, Watson being senior officer of the squadron of small vessels appointed to watch the breaking up of the ice, and to see that no Russian warships got to sea. It was an arduous service well performed. The Impérieuse continued with the flying squadron in the Baltic during the campaigns of 1854 and 1855, and until the signing of peace in March 1856. As the senior officer of the frigate squadron, and generally on detached service, Watson demonstrated the highest standards of seamanship, judgement, and leadership. After the peace the Impérieuse was sent to the North American station; she returned to England and was paid off early in 1857. From May 1856 until his death Watson was naval aide-de-camp to the queen. In June 1859 he was appointed captain-superintendent of Sheerness Dockyard, where he died on 5 July 1860. An officer of great ability, Watson was one of the last great sailing-ship captains, and the first frigate captain of the steam era."
had a first rate tiffin prepared in his cabin, to which the ladies repaired after the second race was over. The band of the ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
aided in the pleasure of the day by playing several selections and airs from our finest operas. After the Gentlemen had refreshed themselves, and the fifth race was over, dancing commenced, and was kept up with great spirit until 6 o'clock. little or no attention being paid to the ensuing races.
The arrival of this day had been eagerly anticipated, and we are certain that all will agree that it passed off with entire satisfaction, altho' we could not but feel regret at the dancing being broken off at the early hour it was.

XThis contribution does not appear in Bampfield's Extracts.

  • H.M.S. HimalayaX
    The Himalaya was built by the P&O (Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company) and purchased by the Royal Navy to serve as a transport ship in 1854. When she was completed as a passenger liner for the P&O, she was the largest vessel in the world (244). She was 340 feet 5 inches long, 46 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 24 feet in the hold. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The advent of the Russian War in 1854 witnessed the first large-scale taking up of large merchant vessels to serve as auxiliaries, instead of the traditional practice of using elderly warships; the majority of these were iron-hulled screw ships, which gave the navy considerable experience of metal hulls prior to their wholesale adoption for large warships" (243). The Himalaya was sunk by German dive-bombers during a German air raid in 1940. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    sailed for England on Friday the 12th Instant, with invalids and refugees from LucknowX

    Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

    . We hope next week to be able to present our readers with a slight account of her arrangements.
  • Commodore WatsonX

    Commodore Rundle Burges Watson

    From “Watson, Rundle Burges” by by J. K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Watson, Rundle Burges (1809–1860), naval officer, was the eldest son of Captain Joshua Rowley Watson (1772–1810). He entered the navy in November 1821, and was promoted lieutenant on 7 October 1829. [. . .] On 23 December 1842 he was advanced to post rank, and on 24 December was made a CB. [. . .] In December 1852 [Watson] was appointed to the new steam frigate Impérieuse (50 guns), then, and for some years later, considered one of the finest ships in the navy. In 1854 she was sent into the Baltic in advance of the fleet, Watson being senior officer of the squadron of small vessels appointed to watch the breaking up of the ice, and to see that no Russian warships got to sea. It was an arduous service well performed. The Impérieuse continued with the flying squadron in the Baltic during the campaigns of 1854 and 1855, and until the signing of peace in March 1856. As the senior officer of the frigate squadron, and generally on detached service, Watson demonstrated the highest standards of seamanship, judgement, and leadership. After the peace the Impérieuse was sent to the North American station; she returned to England and was paid off early in 1857. From May 1856 until his death Watson was naval aide-de-camp to the queen. In June 1859 he was appointed captain-superintendent of Sheerness Dockyard, where he died on 5 July 1860. An officer of great ability, Watson was one of the last great sailing-ship captains, and the first frigate captain of the steam era."
    C.B. inspected her previous to her departure.
  • H.M.S. Megoera has taken the berth lately occupied by the "HimalayaX
    The Himalaya was built by the P&O (Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company) and purchased by the Royal Navy to serve as a transport ship in 1854. When she was completed as a passenger liner for the P&O, she was the largest vessel in the world (244). She was 340 feet 5 inches long, 46 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 24 feet in the hold. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The advent of the Russian War in 1854 witnessed the first large-scale taking up of large merchant vessels to serve as auxiliaries, instead of the traditional practice of using elderly warships; the majority of these were iron-hulled screw ships, which gave the navy considerable experience of metal hulls prior to their wholesale adoption for large warships" (243). The Himalaya was sunk by German dive-bombers during a German air raid in 1940. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " and has commenced coaling. She will sail for Sydney early next week.

XThis article appears as the fifth contribution to issue 10 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield does not provide an author's initial

  • On Thursday night (Feb. 11) about 11 o'clock a very heavy thunderstorm passed over us. The best description of the hailstones which fell on this occasion is to say that in size and shape, though not in colour or taste, they resembled very large "acidulated drops" The lightning was very vivid and of a beautiful pale blue color.
  • Messrs Palmer, Weatherstone and Smithers. Second Class Boys, have taken their departure for England in the "HimalayaX
    The Himalaya was built by the P&O (Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company) and purchased by the Royal Navy to serve as a transport ship in 1854. When she was completed as a passenger liner for the P&O, she was the largest vessel in the world (244). She was 340 feet 5 inches long, 46 feet at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 24 feet in the hold. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "The advent of the Russian War in 1854 witnessed the first large-scale taking up of large merchant vessels to serve as auxiliaries, instead of the traditional practice of using elderly warships; the majority of these were iron-hulled screw ships, which gave the navy considerable experience of metal hulls prior to their wholesale adoption for large warships" (243). The Himalaya was sunk by German dive-bombers during a German air raid in 1940. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    "
    XFrom McArthur's appendix: "These boys were always in trouble and were sent home to be discharged from the Service."
  • A Cricket Ball is announced to take place on Monday the 15th Inst. to which the officers have received a general invitation.
  • We hear that the Royal Navy are likely to be challenged to a match at Cricket by the Officers of the P. and O. Company.

[No Title]

XThis pun does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

XOnly one of these conundrums ("a tiger's foot & a semi-colon") appears as the tenth contribution to issue 11 (with the answer) in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield attributes the contribution to "J."

  • 15. What is the slight difference between a tiger's foot & a semi-colon?
  • 16. What beer ought dandies to drink?
  • 17. Why ought a man married to a girl of a certain name be never dull or melancholy?
  • 18. When does an insolent Debtor become a Navy man?

XThis enigma does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

  • (2 Letters) To surpass? A Fowl? Superfluity? A Turkish magistrate? To coop up? & an English County?
  • (3 Letters) A Foe? An Image? A Hollow-place?
  • (4 Letters) A little of honour? Ability? (5 Letters) haste?

XThis charade does not appear in Bampfield's Extracts.

Gaily floats the "burning" light And merrily works the "Trunion?" The schoolboy dreads the cane's sharp "cuts" And reds his hands with "onion" The drunken "sot in" riot" lost soon mourns his destitution And greatly needs the "Young Idea" Some friendly "contribution?" C.

XThis enigma appears as the ninth contribution to issue 11 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "J."

If my sweeheart of only two letters may be M.A. (Emma) L.N. (Ellen) or K.T. (Katey) most surely is she with pockets quite M.T. (Empty) my home in D.K. (decay) How I N.V. (Envy) the rich in their gorgeous R.A. (array) I have sold my F.X. (effects) and am thoroughly needy. No wonder I feel most uncommonly C.D. (seedy).

XThis article appears as the eighth contribution to issue 9 (an entirely different issue) in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield does not provide an author's initial.

  • 14. When is an Editor like a coachman driving a restive tandem? When he cannot compose the Leader.
Rebus. Doldrum

XThis publication information does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

Published at the office No. 1 Port Street, "Chesapeake" every Saturday. Contributions solicited
Saturday 13 February, 1858.
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"The Young Idea"

"Chesapeake" Chronicle and Weekly Journal

Saturday February 20th 1858

No. 11

XThis article does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.
that we are destined to convey Lady CanningX

Canning

From “Canning [née Stuart], Charlotte Elizabeth, Countess Canning” by by K. D. Reynolds in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Canning [née Stuart], Charlotte Elizabeth, Countess Canning (1817–1861), courtier and vicereine of India, was born at the British embassy in Paris on 31 March 1817, the elder of the two daughters of Sir Charles Stuart, later Baron Stuart de Rothesay (1779–1845), diplomatist, and his wife, Lady Elizabeth Yorke (1789–1867), daughter of the third earl of Hardwicke. Like her sister Louisa [see Beresford, Louisa, marchioness of Waterford], Charlotte Stuart was celebrated for her beauty, piety, and artistic talent. [. . .] At eighteen she married, on 5 September 1835, Charles John Canning (1812–1862), only surviving son of the prime minister, George Canning, and heir to his mother's viscountcy. [. . .] In June 1855 Lord Canning accepted the post of governor-general of India. ‘[I] will not take any part in the decision but only be ready to follow like a dog,' [. . .] his wife wrote, rather dispiritedly. They left London in November, travelling to Calcutta via Paris, Malta, and Egypt, pausing in Bombay, Ceylon, and Madras before reaching their destination on 29 February 1856. [. . .] The year of the Indian mutiny, 1857, put a tremendous emotional and physical strain on the Cannings. Charlotte was kept well away from the dangerous areas, but she gathered information assiduously, keeping the queen informed in detail of the events as they unfolded, and was able to dispel some of the worst atrocity stories: ‘there is not a particle of evidence of the poor women having been “ill-used” anywhere’, she wrote. [. . .](Death, murder, starvation, and the mutilation of corpses did not compare to the horror felt at the idea of interracial rape.) To Lady Canning, the queen was able regularly to express her complete confidence in the beleaguered Canning, who was under continual pressure from the British at home and in India to exact a bloody retribution. Canning was able to rely on his wife to communicate with his colleagues in Britain when the pressures of the situation overwhelmed his correspondence. [. . .] The revolt over, Canning was elevated to an earldom, the government of India was removed from the hands of the East India Company, and the governor-generalship was transformed into a viceroyalty. The new vicereine travelled widely throughout India, from Madras in the south, to the borders of Tibet in the north. She sketched and painted as she went, and wrote detailed accounts of her travels to her family and to the queen. Despite the difficulties, she had come to enjoy India, but was looking forward to her frequently postponed return to England, which was set for January 1862. In October 1861 she journeyed through Darjeeling, to the borders of Sikkim, and saw Mount Everest, but her mind was on home and planning for the future there. She returned to Calcutta on 8 November, clearly suffering from ‘jungle fever’, or malaria. Four days later she was confined to bed, and shortly afterwards her mind started wandering, and she died at 2.30 in the morning of 18 November."
to MadrasX

Madras is now known as Chennai

, and from these, it is said, we steer to RangoonX

Rangoon is now known as Yangon

.
This will of course involve an absence of some two or three months, and will we hope, be found to prove a beneficial change, for, after all, there is nothing like constant change of air, of scenery, and position for enhancing the excitement and monotony of a sea life.: two varied sentiments, which, however, are most peculiarly our own.
RangoonX

Rangoon is now known as Yangon

we have been informed offers no advantages or inducements as a place of pleasure, and no amusements are to be obtained, wherewith to assist the laggard hours, as each day "draws its slow length along" but then we shall return in a riper mood for the enjoyment of the few recreations CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

affords.
Besides, we are unable to foresee what other seaport we may visit, what circumstances, may befall us, what fortune may be our lot, and in the fresh kindled sensations of excitement & wonder, which stir our hearts, when visiting strange shores, and towns, and people; we shall find an agreeable relief to the feeling of satiety, to which the interest, we originally felt in this the so-called "City of Palaces" has not begun to succumb; having been disappointed in the hopes we had entertained on arrival View Page
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XThis article appears in the same position (second contribution to issue 11) in Bampfield's extracts.

The city of DelhiX

Delhi is now known as Delhi

originally bore the name of Indraprasthe, and was the royal capital of the aboriginal Pandoos. After falling into decay and lying desolate for a period of eight centuries, it was revived again (about A.D. 792) by a descendant of the ancient Kings, entitled Bulwan Deo.
It was he who changed the name from Indraprasthe to DelhiX

Delhi is now known as Delhi

, the origin of which is related as follows:-
"There was in one part of the city an iron "kheel" or pillar, said to have been left standing by the ancient "Pandoos" Tradition attached a sacred import to this pillar, and alleged it to be based upon a pedestal fixed in the regions of hell. As Bulwan Deo doubted the truth of the legend, the sceptic monarch determined to test the depth, and he caused the pillar to be violently shaken. A stream of blood immediately gushed up from the earth's centre, and the pillar from that time became loose or in their own language "dheli"
This was the original of the name of DelhiX

Delhi is now known as Delhi

CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

Englishman

XThis article appears as the first contribution to issue 11 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "J."

We have as yet said little or nothing about the movements of our Naval Brigade up the country, being ourselves very much in the dark concerning them. But such information as we possess, we are happy to communicate to our Readers.
We have in fact two separate Brigades, one under Capt PeelX

Captain Peel

From “Peel, Sir William” by by J. K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: :"Peel, Sir William (1824–1858), naval officer, third and favourite son of Sir Robert Peel, second baronet (1788–1850) [and] prime minister. [...] On 13 September 1856 [Peel] commissioned the Shannon, a powerful 50-gun steamfrigate, for service in China. She did not sail until the following March. At Singapore she was met by the news of the Indian mutiny, and took Lord Elgin up to Hong Kong, arriving on 2 July. Admiral Sir Michael Seymour sent the Shannon back to Calcutta on July 16, with Elgin on board, together with a detachment of marines and soldiers. At Calcutta, Peel formed a naval brigade. On 14 August he left the ship with 450 men, six 24-pounder Bengal artillery guns, and two 8 inch howitzers. At Allahabad on 20 October he was reinforced by a party of 120 men, and from then on was present in all the principal operations. The coolness of his bravery was everywhere remarkable, and his formidable battery gave most efficient service: the huge guns were, under his orders, moved and worked as though they were light field pieces. On 21 January 1858 he was nominated a KCB and an aidede-camp to the queen. In 1858 Peel's brigade employed six naval 8 inch guns from the Shannon. Peel mounted these massive weapons, weighing 65 cwt each, on carriages locally constructed by the sailors. They provided the firepower to overcome the massive walls of Indian forts, and to keep down British casualties. In the second relief of Lucknow on 9 March 1858 Peel was severely wounded in the thigh by a musket bullet, which was cut out from the opposite side of the leg. Still very weak, he reached Cawnpore on his way to England, and there, on 20 April, he contracted smallpox, of which he died on 27 April, aged thirty-three."
, the other under Capt SothebyX

Captain Sotheby

From “Sotheby, Sir Edward Southwell” by L. G. C. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: “Sotheby, Sir Edward Southwell (1813–1902), naval officer, born at Clifton, Bristol, on 14 May 1813. […] In July 1857 the Pearl, with the frigate Shannon (Captain William Peel), was sent from Hong Kong to Calcutta on the receipt of news of the outbreak of the Indian mutiny. While on passage, the Pearl rescued the crew of the wrecked transport Transit. Sotheby himself took command of the Pearl's brigade; they were thirteen times mentioned in dispatches relating to the operations in Oudh, and received the thanks of both houses of parliament and of the governor-general of India. Sotheby was made a CB and served as an extra aide-de-camp to the queen (1858–67).”
: Capt PeelX

Captain Peel

From “Peel, Sir William” by by J. K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: :"Peel, Sir William (1824–1858), naval officer, third and favourite son of Sir Robert Peel, second baronet (1788–1850) [and] prime minister. [...] On 13 September 1856 [Peel] commissioned the Shannon, a powerful 50-gun steamfrigate, for service in China. She did not sail until the following March. At Singapore she was met by the news of the Indian mutiny, and took Lord Elgin up to Hong Kong, arriving on 2 July. Admiral Sir Michael Seymour sent the Shannon back to Calcutta on July 16, with Elgin on board, together with a detachment of marines and soldiers. At Calcutta, Peel formed a naval brigade. On 14 August he left the ship with 450 men, six 24-pounder Bengal artillery guns, and two 8 inch howitzers. At Allahabad on 20 October he was reinforced by a party of 120 men, and from then on was present in all the principal operations. The coolness of his bravery was everywhere remarkable, and his formidable battery gave most efficient service: the huge guns were, under his orders, moved and worked as though they were light field pieces. On 21 January 1858 he was nominated a KCB and an aidede-camp to the queen. In 1858 Peel's brigade employed six naval 8 inch guns from the Shannon. Peel mounted these massive weapons, weighing 65 cwt each, on carriages locally constructed by the sailors. They provided the firepower to overcome the massive walls of Indian forts, and to keep down British casualties. In the second relief of Lucknow on 9 March 1858 Peel was severely wounded in the thigh by a musket bullet, which was cut out from the opposite side of the leg. Still very weak, he reached Cawnpore on his way to England, and there, on 20 April, he contracted smallpox, of which he died on 27 April, aged thirty-three."
taking the greater portion of the "ShannonX
HMS Shannon was a Royal Navy screw frigate in the Liffey class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was launched on November 24, 1855 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on December 29, 1856. She was 235 feet 1 inch feet long, 50 feet 1 1/2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 18 feet 4 1/2 inches. She was built for a company of 560 men. HMS Shannon was sold to be broken up for parts at Charlton in 1871. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
's" Crew, and raising a considerable addition from the merchant seamen, numbering in all about 500 men.
These ascending the river to AllahabadX

Allahabad is now known as Allahābād

with several of their heavy guns, advanced afterwards to CawnporeX

Cawnpore is now known as Kānpur

, where they rendered almost unprecedented service, and are now stationed at Futty ghur, ready to advance upon LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

from the N.W.
CaptSothebyX

Captain Sotheby

From “Sotheby, Sir Edward Southwell” by L. G. C. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: “Sotheby, Sir Edward Southwell (1813–1902), naval officer, born at Clifton, Bristol, on 14 May 1813. […] In July 1857 the Pearl, with the frigate Shannon (Captain William Peel), was sent from Hong Kong to Calcutta on the receipt of news of the outbreak of the Indian mutiny. While on passage, the Pearl rescued the crew of the wrecked transport Transit. Sotheby himself took command of the Pearl's brigade; they were thirteen times mentioned in dispatches relating to the operations in Oudh, and received the thanks of both houses of parliament and of the governor-general of India. Sotheby was made a CB and served as an extra aide-de-camp to the queen (1858–67).”
, shortly after, having landed his little crew from the "PearlX
HMS Pearl was a Royal Navy screw corvette with twenty-one guns in the Pearl class. She was launched on February 13, 1855 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on January 25, 1856. She was 200 feet long, 40 feet 4 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 23 feet 11 inches. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the 1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). HMS Pearl was sold to be broken up for parts at Charlton in 1884. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
,' increased his numbers from other sources to about 250 men. These advanced up the river, we believe, as far as ChupraX

Chupra is now known as Chhapra

, and then took to the land: they have marched through GoruckpoorX

Goruckpoor is now known as Gorakhpur

and FyzabadX

Fyzabad is now known as Faizābād

, at each place encountering the enemy and rendering good service with their long guns: several companies of bra little Ghookas are attached to CaptSothebyX

Captain Sotheby

From “Sotheby, Sir Edward Southwell” by L. G. C. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: “Sotheby, Sir Edward Southwell (1813–1902), naval officer, born at Clifton, Bristol, on 14 May 1813. […] In July 1857 the Pearl, with the frigate Shannon (Captain William Peel), was sent from Hong Kong to Calcutta on the receipt of news of the outbreak of the Indian mutiny. While on passage, the Pearl rescued the crew of the wrecked transport Transit. Sotheby himself took command of the Pearl's brigade; they were thirteen times mentioned in dispatches relating to the operations in Oudh, and received the thanks of both houses of parliament and of the governor-general of India. Sotheby was made a CB and served as an extra aide-de-camp to the queen (1858–67).”
's division but our bluejackets have charge of the Artillery; they are now ready to advance upon LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

from the Eastward, and we may hope therefore, that under the walls of this stronghold, our brave comrades of the "PearlX
HMS Pearl was a Royal Navy screw corvette with twenty-one guns in the Pearl class. She was launched on February 13, 1855 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on January 25, 1856. She was 200 feet long, 40 feet 4 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 23 feet 11 inches. As Lyon and Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the 1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). HMS Pearl was sold to be broken up for parts at Charlton in 1884. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
" and "ShannonX
HMS Shannon was a Royal Navy screw frigate in the Liffey class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was launched on November 24, 1855 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on December 29, 1856. She was 235 feet 1 inch feet long, 50 feet 1 1/2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 18 feet 4 1/2 inches. She was built for a company of 560 men. HMS Shannon was sold to be broken up for parts at Charlton in 1871. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
" may again meet in victory, and assist in crushing out the last sparks of the rebellion in India.
We have told our tale to the best of our knowledge, but if any of our readers possess or can procure more accurate information, we shall be deeply indebted to them for making it public in our

XThis article appears in the same position (fourth contribution to issue 11) in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "J."

XThis article appears in the same position (fourth contribution to issue 11) in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "J."

On Wednesday the 17th Inst. a match took place on the ground near the the Ochterbury monumentX

the Ochterbury monument is now known as Ochterlony Monument

between the Officers of H.M.S. "ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
, and the Petty Officers, assisted by Messrs Mereweather, Budding, & Edwards of PyladesX
HMS Pylades was a Royal Navy First class Corvette with twenty-one guns, the only vessel in the Pylades class. The Admiralty ordered the ship on December 24, 1852. She was launched on November 23, 1854 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on March 29, 1855. The length of the gundeck was 192 feet and 9 inches, the breadth at the broadest part of the ship was 38 feet, and the depth in the hold was 23 feet and 11 inches. It is unclear how many men served on Pylades class vessels, but Jason class vessels (also 21-gun Corvettes) carried 240 men (210). As David Lyon and Rif Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the 1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional frigate role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). The Pylades was broken up for parts on January 23, 1875 (208). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All The Ships of The Royal Navy 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
. Having received a good account of the game with the scoring made on this occasion, and this being the first time our club has done battle with other players, we feel bound to give it a place in our columns. View Page
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The P.O.'s had the first lead, and here we must notice the free batting of TaylorX

Edward Taylor

Edward Taylor, assistant engineer 3rd class (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on July 25, 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster book"Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
, who made some capital hits till a "ripper" from Mr BrownriggX

Charles J. Brownrigg

Charles J. Brownrigg, a mate (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on August 4th, 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster book."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
levelled his stirrups to the tune of 24 runs. Of the remainder only three managed to make scores, and amongst them, we may mention a good stroke for 5 of ReynoldsX

S. Reynolds

S. Reynolds, an ordinary seaman, joined the Chesapeake on September 4, 1857. He was born in Landport (Portsmouth) in 1839, making him nineteen at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
. Owing to the excellent fielding of Mr. ShorttX

John Shortt

John Shortt, a subordinate officer, joined the Chesapeake on July 23, 1857, after serving aboard HMS Euridice. He was born in Bombay in 1838, making him twenty at the time of this cricket match in Calcutta."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
as Longstop, they only managed to score 2 Byes.
The officers now went in, but did not make as much play as was expected: Mr. McArthur'sX

Alexander D. McArthur

Alexander D. McArthur, a clerk, joined the Chesapeake on December 9, 1857. He was born on December 25, 1835, in Woolwich, Kent, making him twenty-one when he came aboard. Census records for the town of Woolwich in 1851 reveal the family of John McAurthur, a captain in the Royal Marines, who lived with his wife, Mary E., a son James (a gentleman, aged 29), a son John (no occupation, aged 27), a son Henry (a clerk in the wine trade, aged 17), a son Alexander D (a scholar, aged 15), a son Hanibal (no occupation, aged 13), and a servant Esther Johnson (aged 20).
wicket being laid low by a "daisy clipper" from Bew at the very first ball. This, and the retiring of our BrownriggX

Charles J. Brownrigg

Charles J. Brownrigg, a mate (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on August 4th, 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster book."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
(to whom all looked for a large score) soon after, by one of the same puzzlers, damped the spirits of the Gentlemen, but the good play of Mr. TheobaldX

C.B. Theobald

C. B. Theobald, a naval cadet, joined the Chesapeake on July 24, 1857. He was born in Mark's Tey, Essex, in 1843, making him fifteen at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
, who kept the field alive till he was caught out by CooperX

Cooper

There are three different members of the ship's company with the last name Cooper. The only thing we can tell about the "Cooper" referenced in the cricket match is that he was not a commissioned officer, but an ordinary seaman."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
: and of Mr ShorttX

John Shortt

John Shortt, a subordinate officer, joined the Chesapeake on July 23, 1857, after serving aboard HMS Euridice. He was born in Bombay in 1838, making him twenty at the time of this cricket match in Calcutta."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
, who was finally run out, gave them renewed ardour.
At the conclusion of the first innings which was a close struggle, both parties scored the same, and bets were now freely offered of 3 to 1 upon the Gentlemen.
The P.O's now went in again, and now Mr. BrownriggX

Charles J. Brownrigg

Charles J. Brownrigg, a mate (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on August 4th, 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster book."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
shone forth in his true light as a first rate Bowler: their best man soon had his wicket rattled down, and in one over three batsmen took their places and as quickly retired to his well delivered balls which kept the umpire continually employed in repitching the wickets. The result was the P.O's second innings only amounted to 41 runs, making a total of 90.
Mr BrownriggX

Charles J. Brownrigg

Charles J. Brownrigg, a mate (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on August 4th, 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster book."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
and Mr ShorttX

John Shortt

John Shortt, a subordinate officer, joined the Chesapeake on July 23, 1857, after serving aboard HMS Euridice. He was born in Bombay in 1838, making him twenty at the time of this cricket match in Calcutta."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
now took their places, and the play became remarkably good and lively, until Mr ShorttX

John Shortt

John Shortt, a subordinate officer, joined the Chesapeake on July 23, 1857, after serving aboard HMS Euridice. He was born in Bombay in 1838, making him twenty at the time of this cricket match in Calcutta."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858, held by the National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
unfortunately delivered a ball back to the bowler, and was thus caught out.
Mr WilkinsonX

Wilkinson

Mr. Wilkinson, a clerk (a subordinate officer), joined the Chesapeake on July 23, 1857 after serving aboard HMS Majestic. He was born in Suffolk in 1836, which would make him twenty-two at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta"Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
relieved him, and "fast and furious" was the game. Mr Brownrigg serving out 4s & 5s, & 3s to all parts of the field, Mr WilkinsonX

Wilkinson

Mr. Wilkinson, a clerk (a subordinate officer), joined the Chesapeake on July 23, 1857 after serving aboard HMS Majestic. He was born in Suffolk in 1836, which would make him twenty-two at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta"Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
backing him up with steady play, and some first rate forward drives. These two remained in for upwards of an hour together, till at last a "disturber" from BewX

James Bew

James Bew, an experienced seaman, joined the Chesapeake on August 1, 1857. He was born in 1833, making him twenty-five at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
rattled the bails off Mr Wilkinson'sX

Wilkinson

Mr. Wilkinson, a clerk (a subordinate officer), joined the Chesapeake on July 23, 1857 after serving aboard HMS Majestic. He was born in Suffolk in 1836, which would make him twenty-two at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta"Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
stumps, and came out with his flushing honours thick upon him.
Mr McArthurX

Alexander D. McArthur

Alexander D. McArthur, a clerk, joined the Chesapeake on December 9, 1857. He was born on December 25, 1835, in Woolwich, Kent, making him twenty-one when he came aboard. Census records for the town of Woolwich in 1851 reveal the family of John McAurthur, a captain in the Royal Marines, who lived with his wife, Mary E., a son James (a gentleman, aged 29), a son John (no occupation, aged 27), a son Henry (a clerk in the wine trade, aged 17), a son Alexander D (a scholar, aged 15), a son Hanibal (no occupation, aged 13), and a servant Esther Johnson (aged 20).
took his bat, but after adding 15 to the score, amongst which were two good hits for 5 and 4, was run out: Mr TheobaldX

C.B. Theobald

C. B. Theobald, a naval cadet, joined the Chesapeake on July 24, 1857. He was born in Mark's Tey, Essex, in 1843, making him fifteen at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
succeeded him, but what the others had apparently gained in play he appeared to have lost for CooperX

Cooper

There are three different members of the ship's company with the last name Cooper. The only thing we can tell about the "Cooper" referenced in the cricket match is that he was not a commissioned officer, but an ordinary seaman."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
soon gained an opening into his wicket. Mr ChuteX

Charles T. Chute

Charles T. Chute, a subordinate officer, joined the Chesapeake on July 23, 1857, after serving aboard Euridice. He was born in London in 1841, making him seventeen at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
and Mr Moore quickly followed and Mr OxleyX

C.L. Oxley

C. L. Oxley, a midshipman, joined the Chesapeake on July 29, 1857. He was born in 1841, making him seventeen at the time of the cricket match in Calcutta."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
now took vis-a-vis to Mr BrownriggX

Charles J. Brownrigg

Charles J. Brownrigg, a mate (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on August 4th, 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster book."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
, and played well and steadily, when darkness coming on the wickets were drawn, Mr BrownriggX

Charles J. Brownrigg

Charles J. Brownrigg, a mate (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on August 4th, 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster book."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
carrying his bat out with a score of 102, and there being yet four wickets to go down.
The following is the score.
Officers v. Petty Officers
"H.M.S. ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
"

Petty Officers

1st Innings 2nd Innings
W. Taylor (1) 24 b Brownrigg 1 b. Brownrigg
D. Wells 0 b McArthur. runout 6 b. McArthur
T. Dukes 6 b. Shortt 11 b. Brownrigg run out
J. Bew 9 b. Shortt 5 b. Brownrigg
T. Reynolds 8 b. Shortt 0 b. Brownrigg
W. Taylor (2) 0 b. McArthur. run out 0 b. Brownrigg
H. Cooper 0 b. Shortt 1 b. Brownrigg c Brown
J. Harding 0 Not out 5 b McArthur St Brown.
Mr. Edwards 0 b. Shortt c Shortt 3 not out
Mr Mereweather 0 b. McArthur St. Brown 9 b. &c. Brownrigg
Byes 2 Byes 0
Total 49 0

Officers

1st Innings 2nd Innings
Brownrigg 6 b. Bew 102 not out
McArthur 0 b. Bew 15 b Bew run out
Wilkinson 4 b Bew 24 b. Bew
Chute 0 b. Wells 10 b. Wells
Theobald 16 b. Wells C. Cooper 0 b. Cooper
Shortt 9 b. Wells run out 4 b. Wells c Wells
Oxley 1 b. Wells 18 not out
Stanley 2 Not out -
Moore 1 b. Bew 8. b Wells c Edwards
Budding 3 b Bew -
Byes 6 Byes 24
No Balls 1
Total 49 205

XThis article appears as the sixth contribution to issue 11 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "W."

This remarkable species of gull has lately been captured at DelhiX

Delhi is now known as Delhi

where it has existed for several centuries It is the largest gull known, as well as the most destructive, and truculent. In fact those who have effected its capture deserve the gratitude of the world, as Hercules did for destroying the great Hydra. It is supposed that the species will soon be extinct. Its plumage is said to have been very gorgeous, but is now considerably tarnished
Several young gulls were caught in the same nest, but from their ferocity, were immediately destroyed. View Page
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XThis article does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

  • On Monday the 15th Inst. H.M. Steam troop ship "Megoera" after being inspected by Commodore R.B. WatsonX

    Commodore Rundle Burges Watson

    From “Watson, Rundle Burges” by by J. K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Watson, Rundle Burges (1809–1860), naval officer, was the eldest son of Captain Joshua Rowley Watson (1772–1810). He entered the navy in November 1821, and was promoted lieutenant on 7 October 1829. [. . .] On 23 December 1842 he was advanced to post rank, and on 24 December was made a CB. [. . .] In December 1852 [Watson] was appointed to the new steam frigate Impérieuse (50 guns), then, and for some years later, considered one of the finest ships in the navy. In 1854 she was sent into the Baltic in advance of the fleet, Watson being senior officer of the squadron of small vessels appointed to watch the breaking up of the ice, and to see that no Russian warships got to sea. It was an arduous service well performed. The Impérieuse continued with the flying squadron in the Baltic during the campaigns of 1854 and 1855, and until the signing of peace in March 1856. As the senior officer of the frigate squadron, and generally on detached service, Watson demonstrated the highest standards of seamanship, judgement, and leadership. After the peace the Impérieuse was sent to the North American station; she returned to England and was paid off early in 1857. From May 1856 until his death Watson was naval aide-de-camp to the queen. In June 1859 he was appointed captain-superintendent of Sheerness Dockyard, where he died on 5 July 1860. An officer of great ability, Watson was one of the last great sailing-ship captains, and the first frigate captain of the steam era."
    C.B, sailed for Sydney.
  • On Friday morning the small arm companies, field piece parties, and marines of the Squadron landed and performed a variety of evolutions, returning on board at 7:30 A.M.
  • H.M.S. ShannonX
    HMS Shannon was a Royal Navy screw frigate in the Liffey class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was launched on November 24, 1855 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on December 29, 1856. She was 235 feet 1 inch feet long, 50 feet 1 1/2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 18 feet 4 1/2 inches. She was built for a company of 560 men. HMS Shannon was sold to be broken up for parts at Charlton in 1871. David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    arrived at Garden ReachX

    Garden Reach is now known as Garden Reach

    from Point De Galle on Thursday Evening and on Friday morning came up to CalcuttaX

    Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

    mooring ahead of the "ChesapeakeX
    HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    ." She brings the 6th Regiment of Infantry, consisting of 22 officers 580 non commissioned officers and Rank and file, and 22 women and 60 children.
  • H.M.S. "ChesapeakeX
    HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    " commenced provisioning on Friday. The launch laden with provisions, was returning to her on Friday evening when she got aground and notwithstanding the strenuous efforts of W. Worsley, remained firmly aground till the following morning at flood. Mr Shortt having volunteered to relieve Mr Worsley, remained in charge of her all night.

XThis article does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

The CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

Englishman has actually been delivered of a pun. Hear it! Oh ye punsters of the earth, and say what shall be done to our poor shore going contemporary. Describing the Military Review on the Espalanade (Novr 24) "They halted" says the Englishman "near the Peepul tree, and People's tree it ought to be called for it was crowded with human denizens." And this vile pun has actually gone home to England. What shall we do to the man who punned it? Shall we enroll him at once among the Pundits of Hindoostan? or shall we condemn him to stand forever fanning us with the Punkah? or shall we consign him to eternal punishment, in the far distant regions of the Punjaab? Altho many would say "Gently with this pun," we cannot help writing pungently, and making a stir about a pun from such a punster.

X"Epitome" appears as the fifth contribution to issue 11 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield does not provide the author's initial.

  • On Monday night the annual Ball given by the CalcuttaX

    Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

    Cricket Club came off. It was numerously attended and passed off most satisfactorily.
  • Our officers have been practising Cricket nearly every day of the past week as it was expected that they would be engaged to play the P. and Os but the latter declined to accept the challenge.
  • On Thursday Evening next the Amateurs of the H.M.S. ChesapeakeX
    HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    will perform at the CalcuttaX

    Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

    Lyric Theatre for the Benefit of the Indian Relief fund. The pieces named are "The Seven Clerks" and "Bombastes Furiosa" between which, nautical songs, hornpipes, &c, will vary the amusements. Tickets 5rs each. reserved seats.

[No Title]

XThis article appears as the eighth contribution to issue 11 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "B."
"There are more ways out of the woods than one," as the rum said when saw a spile coming through the cask.
Maxim for a CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

Storekeeper.
XFrom McArthur's appendix: "Godown is the store or place of Business"

XOne of these conundrums (about the baker, number 19) appears with an answer as the first contribution to issue 11 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur. The conundrum about broken bottles (number 21) appears with an answer as the fourth contribution to issue 12 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "L."

  • 19. When does a baker most want materials for his trade?
  • 20. When does a good idea resemble the bone of a fowl.
  • 21. Supposing a number of bottles were broken by the fall of a tree, what ejaculation would they give vent to?

XThis article appears as the seventh contribution to issue 11 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "L," but it is called a "charade."

The sheep & Ox, in concert met To try their voices reckoned The sheep she bleated forth my first The ox lowed out my second
And as with bleating, lowing sound Their blending voices fluttered A Hindoo squire turned him round. For he heard his title uttered.

XThese conundrums appear as the eighth contribution to issue 9 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield does not provide the author's initial.

  • 15.  What is the slight difference between a tiger's foot and a semi-colon? The one shows its pause at the end of its clause, and the other its claws at the end of its paws.
  • 16. What beer ought dandies to drink? Spruce beer.
  • 17. When might a man married to a girl of a certain name be never dull, or melancholy? When he is animated (Annie-mated)
  • 18. When does an Insolent Debtor become a Navy man? When he is in or belonging to the Fleet.
Alphabetical Enigmas. To surpass, X.L. A Fowl P.N. Superfluity X.S. A Turkish magistrate K.D. To coop it up M.U. an English County S.X. A Foe N.M.E. An Image F.E.G. A Hollow place K.V.T. A Title of honour X.L.N.C. Ability F.E.K.C. Haste X.P.D.N.C.

XThis publication information appears as the eleventh (and final) contribution to issue 11 in Bampfield's Extracts.

Published at the office No. 1 Port Street, "Chesapeake" every Saturday. contributions thankfully received
Saturday 20 February, 1858.
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"The Young Idea"

Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal

Saturday February 27th 1858

No. 12

XThis article appears in the same position (first contribution to issue 12) in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.
, and we feel bound to afford all the space we can for the same The Rajah's dinner, & marriage of his juvenile granddaughter, the Cricket match between our Club & the Squadron and our defeat; the success of our Amateurs in their performance on Thursday night; all afford a supply of intelligence upon the requisite space for which we are loath to encroach. A few days more and we shall look back upon CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

and all the pleasures it has afforded us, as a mem'ry of the past, & fresh scenes will meet us, and in turn give way to others. We shall almost regret the distance, which will soon be placed between us & CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

, for we are desirous to know of the operations at LucknowX

Lucknow is now known as Lucknow

, and it is most likely we shall not hear of the events which will take place in that quarter until some time after their occurrence. We earnestly hope that the blow may be struck speedily, & let us not forget, in our regret for our absence that it is certain to be "all for the best":- for our actions and movements are under the wise ordinance of One who knows more than we can, and who "disposes, when man proposes."

XThis article appears as the third contribution to issue 13 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.

On Monday night the 22d Inst. of the Rajah Budderaunth Roy Behadoor celebrated the marriage of his Granddaughter, with a grand dinner party fireworks and a nautch. For the information of those of our readers who were unfortunately unable to go, we will attempt a slight description of the events of the evening, altho' we feel that our pen will fail to convey to the edea an adequate impression to that which was the result of witnessing it "in propria persona."
We left the ship rather late (about 7 PM the dinner being announced for 7:30) and on landing at Baboo's Ghant found to our dismay that no garrie was waiting for us, this caused some little consternation, but a consultation being held, we acted speedily upon its determination, & were quickly ensconced in palanqains on arriving at Wilson's Hotel, we managed to obtain a garrie & without further delay than we could help, set off for Cossipore. Our [indecipherable] proved to be one of the best of his kind, keeping his cattle well up to the mark.
We passed through the dirty, dismal, native quarter, faintly lit by the flickering glare of oil lamps, with dusky, half clad forms flitting about in the misty, smoky atmosphere, which made our eyes smart and fill with tears. Here and there in the deep, gloomy, shade of the interior of an old and shaky building, could be seen a dark object bending over the earthenware pan, in which the evening meal was cooking, whilst the flare of the lambent flame as it shot up from under, would for an instant light up his dim countenance & the surrounding objects, and then as instantly subsiding would render the obscurity more intense than ever.
As we speeded along and left the suburbs of the city, emerging into more open country, the notes of warning our driver had been repeatedly uttering, gradually ceased, and we found ourselves passing extensive gardens, with an occaView Page
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sional hut here, & there. At last we arrived at a place where four roads met, & most likely would have proceeded straight on, had not a figure which stood in the road acquainted our driver that his proper course was the turning to the right.
Shortly after a blaze of light on our left hand told us that we were approaching our goal, a few minutes more and we entered the Rajah's garden. We were quite surprized at the number of lamps, and the brilliancy of the illuminations, it was a transition from night to day: altho we consider that the effect would have been more perfect had the lamps been variegated. On our left was a large tank, surrounded by railings, on which lamps were hung, close together, we are perfectly unable to judge of the probable number in this spot alone, for the tank was one of the largest we have seen, & the lights almost touched on another: the reflection in the still water, greatly enhanced the effect, especially that caused by a large building on the opposite side, which was in one perfect blaze, & of which we shall speak more fully anon.
The strains of a band met our ears as we rattled down to the garden house, where upon emerging from our trap, we found the dinner was proceeding. We entered and soon procured seats, which were apparently the only empty ones, for we noticed some after arrivals who were unable to obtain even a corner of the table. The dinner was in every respect perfect. having been placed under the sole arrangement of Messrs Wilson & Co of Auckland Hotel, we regretted much not having arrived in time to witness the appearance of the table previous to the attack, but as it was (fish having been just removed) it looked remarkably well and the taste displayed in the several minutiae which characterize a well laid table, spoke well for the capacity of the hands to whose care the management was entrusted. The room itself was gaily decorated with banners & flags of England, France and Turkey, and was well lighted by chandeliers, and Moderator lamps. The many uniforms, of which red decidedly preponderated, & the glittering of the naval epaulettes, varied with the sober black of the civilians, greatly enhanced the brilliancy of the table.
Having appeased our appetite and slaked our thirst with first rate champagne & hearing sounds of native music & singing in an adjoining room, we quitted the table and adjourned to the apartment whence the sounds proceeded. On our way thither we stopped to examine several swords & spears, daggers & c of real Damascus steel and beautifully worked, the hilts & crosspieces, inlaid with gold and precious stones of all kinds. We also saw a magnificent diamond in a glass case, said to be worth £180.000. Of furniture we cannot speak as the rooms are all furnished in Eastern style, & consequently there is no display of tables, and chairs, couches, settees, &c, &c, which we see in our commonest drawing rooms in England. One small table & that of marble, supported a tray with betel nut and a jug of water for the benefit of the native guests, & carpets, spread upon a platform in a room through which we passed, were appropriated to their use.
On entering the room from which the nautch music had proceeded, we found that we were just too late, as we caught a stern view of the musicians, as they passed out of the door opposite to that we entered by. The interior presented a very gay appearance, for here we saw the various garbs and picturesque dresses of the native visitors, who were seated on a cushioned seat which went all round the room. Some were arrayed most magnificently in shawls woven with gold, velvet embroiderd with gold, in fact all the garments were heavy and thick with gold. The Rajah himself wore round his neck a diamond necklace valued at £200,000 and almost all wore heavy massive gold chains.
The sharp whiz of a rocket announced to us that the fireworks were commencing. We immediately allied forth and found ourselves in front of the tank, which was reflecting on its placid surface the last falling stars of the first rocket: carriages, & horses, were near and around us, and as a blaze of light suddenly illuminated the whole scene before us, the poor frightened animals snorted & started with terror, & required the utmost efforts of the drivers to keep them from fairly bolting away. Our first care was to get out of the way of anything like a horse, and then we turned to view the magnificent spectacle before us. In front & around us on every side, bright masses of flame, shot up in the air, dense masses of smoke curled heavily upwards, thro' which flights of rockets shot with their hissing roar and blue fireballs formed their graceful curves.
On our right a large piece of firework was set fire to, from its original appearance we supposed that it was intended to pourtray the burning of a house, but as it quickly went into an entire flame, it only represented a burst of flame lighting up the visages of those around us with a pale unearthly glare, and by the strong but fitful illumination which it cast on the projecting points of the building, throwing the recesses into gloomier shadow. In various parts of the gardens, fresh gleams of light shot up & rockets filled the air with their fiery balls, threatening to cause some damage by their falling sticks, which very often descended amongst the crowd.
The brilliant scene was rendered doubly impressive by the reflecting of water & the dense volume of smoke which hung like a canopy over the whole gardens. The display which formed the finale, was erected on the opposite bank of the tank, to that on which we stood and when first lighted represented a square body of white fire and an arch. As the fire decreased, a blue flickering flame made its appearance, and gradually increased in strength until at last in the square, we read the sentence, "God save the Queen, and the Young couple every Happiness," and the arch shone forth as an arbour over which the blue flame played in a wavy, flickering light. This was immediately hailed with three hearty cheers from the Officers & Englishmen present, and the company then strolled about enjoying in many cases the luxury of [indecipherable]. We followed the example and then returned to the building to witness the nautch, which was about to recommence.
After a short time the performers entered. They consisted of a girl, dressed in a dark brown gauze dress, and scarf trimmed & embroidered profusely with gold, and particoloured trousers, made very full so as to hide the feet. Her headdress consisted of a frontlet, hanging over the forehead with side pieces and a backpiece, all of gold or imitation and studded with various coloured stones. Her hands were adorned with rings & from one on each finger a chain communicated with a circular View Page
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plate of gold, as also from the bracelets, the back of the hand being thus covered with gold. Her personal appearance was not in the least attractive in fact she looked most remarkably like a monkey dressed up Four musicians accompanied her in her song, which was perfectly unintelligible, altho' good taste was exhibited in the instrumental sound being commanded by the vocal of the musicians two played upon a species of violin supported in a linen band which went round the waist, the bow being handled in much the same manner as a bass viol player would hold it Another had two little brass cymbals about the size of the palm of the hand, which he manipulated with extreme dexterity, and under his able guidance they emitted a pleasant jingling sound. The fourth played on two small drums of curious shape & make suspended round his waist in a linen cloth, and which were played by the action of the fingers & palms of the hand. The costumes of the men were nothing out of the common native dress excepting the nether garments of the "drummer" as we call him, and we heard them very much admired, not only for their pattern, "a pink check":-but for the cut & fit, which would have gained the envy and admiration of all Regent Street, had they been there displayed.
The dancing consisted of an advancing & retrograde movement, accompanied with a waving motion of the hands the arms being held in would-be graceful positions over the head, & the feet being occasionally brought together so as to make the anclets strike & jingle. Altogether nothing absurd and vapid ever met our gaze, novelty was its only charm, and we left the room to visit the marriage presents & the celebration of the marriage ceremony.
We bent our steps towards the building we have mentioned as attracting our attention from its blaze of light, when we entered. Here we found all the presents arranged for exhibition, amongst which we noticed cup, and trays of solid silver, two handsome enamelled serpent-bracelets studded with diamonds and amethysts, with large rubies in the heads, a necklace of pearls, with emeralds at equidistances: several handsome cachmere shawls, gold rings, linen pieces silver worked vases, and a bedstead of solid sliver, with rose coloured mosquito curtains and a coverlet of Persian workmanship. Wreaths of white flowers were heaped up in a silver bowl, and on a large plate of the same metal small bouquets of flowers were arranged.
Close by under a canopy supported by poles of solid silver, sat the bridegroom robed in a splendid shawl, and surrounded by priests in front of him, sat a nautch girl, with her attendant musicians, keeping up a neverending song in Persian and now, we were informed that the ceremony would commence shortly, so we determined to wait and not miss it. Smoking was not considered offensive, so we whiled away the time, scanning & enquiring into the various novelties surrounding us, which excited our curiosity, and which would require the space of a volume to enumerate. The bridegroom appeared to be about 15 years of age and if we might judge by his countenance did not seem to entertain a high notion of the felicity of his situation.
We had not long to wait before a change took place. The Bridegroom rose from his luxurious seat and the priests arrayed him in snow white linen garments; he now took his station upon a square piece of sandalwood, painted and ornamented in a pretty device, and squatted down in Hindoo fashion upon his haunches: a very strange looking white turban was not placed on his head and in front of this was fastened a high frontlet, made of worked silver wire (and presenting in a front view, the appearance of a parish beadle's cocked hat), with two enormous tassels depending from each end.
He sat, or rather squatted in this position for about half an hour, when the priests again disrobed him and redressed him in red silk leaving the right shoulder & arm bare, again he squatted down, & the large fronlet was removed, & a smaller but similar headdress took its place & the two bracelets I have mentioned before were clasped on his wrists. He now bared his right knee, and his father who was seated on his right hand between two priests, extended his right hand & placed the two forefingers & thumb on his son's knee; at first we were under the impression that he was testing him by introducing some pointed instrument, but as he remained in this position for about ten minutes, we were unable to determine what the intention was. The presents were then shown to him the shawls, rings &c being passed round so his father who held them before him.
Shortly after this ceremony the priests, bridegroom & his father rose, and being once more enveloped in the ample folds of the cachmere shawl, he was led away with torchbearers in front, to visit, (as we were informed) the family, & to be introduced for the first time to the bride. During his absence we were decorated with bouquets & wreaths of a sweet smelling white flower, & presented a very gay appearance with our caps and breasts thus adorned.
About 20 min. elapsed when the bridegroom reappeared and took his station as before on the square of sandalwood, a similar one was placed opposite to him the bride appeared and squatted down upon it; a voice in the crowd immediately called for "Three Cheers for the Bride" which were heartily given. Poor little thing!!! She had arrived at the mature age of 9 and was already to become a wife. She was dressed in red silk similar to her husband, and a ring through her nose. Think of this! Oh! ye' fair brides of England, but let me inform you that this is a religious custom, & was not placed there for her future husband to make use of to "lead her by the nose".
The fingers of her right hand were now entwined with his, and a wreath of flowers bound round them, the holy water of the Ganges was next poured over the joined hands. A gold ring was then placed in the father's hand, who held it in the vessel containing the holy water, and repeated a long unintelligible rigmarole after the priest, after which it was placed on the two joined hands of the young couple & holy water sprinkled over it, Incense was then burnt, the hands separated and the ceremony completed.
The happy (?) pair were led off by torchlight. For ourselves, we made it our study to find our garrie and having succeeded after some little trouble, we were speedily borne from this novel and interesting scene, and returned on board heartily pleased with our excursion.

XThis article does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

XThis article does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

XThis article does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

On Thursday afternoon a Cricket Match took place between the "ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
" eleven, and the Squadron eleven, which resulted we are sorry to say in the defeat of the former. The wickets were pitched at 2 P.M. on the ground near the Ochterbury monumentX

the Ochterbury monument is now known as Ochterlony Monument

, the squadron eleven going into the wickets first. The play was remarkably good, but we consider that the high score made by Mr. HopeX

Hope

Hope played for the "squadron's eleven" and does not appear in the Chesapeake muster book, which means he likely belonged to another ship in the squadron."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
was the cause of the Squadron proving the winners. We must give due credit to them, they played beautifully, and owing to their good fielding, the ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
's were sadly cut up for runs.
The ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
's batted much better View Page
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than they fielded, indeed, it was a strange fact, that those from whom little was expected, played well and steadily, and did much to the augmentation of the score. They were greatly dispirited at the early overthrow of their best man Mr BrownriggX

Charles J. Brownrigg

Charles J. Brownrigg, a mate (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on August 4th, 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster book."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
, who striking at a ball which was pitched high over his head, tipped the ball right into the hands of mid-wicket.
The ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
's were very anxious to finish the game (only one innings having been played) by a second innings on the following day, but the squadron, anxious perhaps to retain the victory, appeared unwilling & finally stated that circumstances would prevent them from playing, and they also declined playing this afternoon, much to the ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
's regret.

Squadron Eleven

Mr. Mereweather 0 b Brownrigg c Brownrigg
" Howes 6 b McArthur Leg before Wicket
" Rockfort 0 b Brownrigg
" Moore 13 b McArthur
" Jefferies 3 b Brownrigg run out
" Hope 50 b McArthur c Stanley
" Boys 9 b Shortt Slump McArthur
" Garlick 0 not out
" Jordan 8 b Chute Leg before Wick
" Limbert 4 b McArthur. run out
" Plow 2 b Brownrigg
Wides 4
Byes 14
Total __________ 113.

Chesapeake Eleven

Mr. Brownrigg 13 b Plow. c Garlick
" Shortt 7 c Limbert b Moore
" Wilkinson 2 b. Plow
" Chute 4 b Moore
" McArthur 16 b Plow
" Moore 7 b Moore c Limbert
" Kennicott 10 not out
" Theobald 1 b Limbert c Moore
" Oxley 5 b Moore
" Farquhar 0 b Now
" Stanley 5 b Moore. run out.
Wides 2
Byes 2
__________ 75

XThis article does not appear in Bampfield's extracts. Instead, the following review (attributed to McArthur) appears as the second contribution to issue 12:
The Theatre
The "Calcutta Lyric Theatre," as it is grandly called is but a poor building, constructed entirely of bamboos & palm-leaf staffing. Standing as it does, in the Esplanade, under the shadow of the Ochterbury Monument, & in sight of the Government House, & other magnificent buildings, it looks a deal more like some country farm barn or temporary shed, [indecipherable] a permanent temple of the Muses. We should conclude, & rightly, that the Calcutta people are not admitted to public Evening amusements, & are fonder of resting at home after the business of the day than of venturing abroad to the venue of histrionic efforts.
Taking this circumstance into consideration, we were glad to see so fair an audience assembled together on Thursday evening to witness the first performance of the "Sailors from the Chesapeake." The Theatre, on entering is far from unpleasing in appearance; the decorations of painted canvas, assisted by the lighted lamps, gave to it an air of decided taste and beauty, which on the present occasion was heightened by the female faces, dark & fair, who occupied the front circle of raised seats. The little semicircular box was chiefly filled by Naval Officers from the Chesapeake, and a select number of our own Bluejackets. The Orchestra contained the Chesapeake band, which if somewhat too noisy from the predominance of brass instruments, at least contributed much to the pleasure of the Evening. The "Royal" Box, in the center of the raised seats, was on this occasion occupied by Commodore Watson, & other patrons of the entertainment, on whose entrance the audience rose, the Band playing our National Anthem.
But we must now speak of our Actors & give the Dramatis Personae, & the names of those who sustained them.
"The Seven Clerks Dramatis Personae"
"The Seven Clerks."
(or the Thief & the Denouncer)
Claude Darnaud (the Miser) Geo. Horner
Count Adolphe Chas. Stewart
Gustavus (his friend) Thos. Walshe
Larosse (a Merchant) Robt. Wilkinson
Simon Siggel, the Miser's Tenant Henry Underhill
Hans, a Dutchman Jno. Walshe
Matteo, an Italian (robbers) Henry Montagu
Jno. Brown, an Englishman Isaac Wright
Pierre Henry Hamilton
Antoine Jas. Browne
Victorine, the Miser's daughter Miss Connell
Peasantry, &c &c.
Nautical Hornpipe Thomas Walshe
Comic Duet, &c Henry Underhill and William Connell
"Bombastes Furioso Dramatis Personae"
"Bombastes Furioso"
Artaxominus, the King Henry Montagu
Fusbas, Prime Minister Charles Stewart
General Bombastes Henry Underhill
Distaffina Miss Connell
The "Seven Clerks", a legend of Marseilles, was admirably revised to develop the various talents of the actors. Geo Horner, as the old Miser, sustained his tragic part most admirably, while St Underhill, as Simon Siggel, in the hunger which he so well pourtrayed, not only called down roars of laughter from the house, but produced a sympathetic feeling, which we were under the necessity of allaying directly the Theatre closed. J. Walshe, as the Dutch Robber, was very clever, & Isaac Wright as the English robber from S. Giles, was no less droll. Great credit also must be given to Chs Stewart, & Wm Connell, who maintained the 2 characters around which the others centered, namely those of Adolphe, & Victorine. Stewart spoke nobly & manfully, & Connell looked and spoke the woman's part, with a grace & tenderness we cd scarcely expect. The various tableaux, & short strains of music, with which the Drama is interspersed, were very pleasing.
The Nautical Hornpipe, by Thos Walshe, that followed, was certainly not so good as one cd hoipe to see from H.M.S. "Chesapeake" & we shd have preferred the promised "Comic Duet" to the Solo song given us by Wm Connell:-but the Calcutta audience were well pleased, both with the dance & song.
In "Bombastes Furioso," we will content ourselves by saying that all sustained their parts admirably, & that roars of laughter resounded thro' the house. As this was the first time that our Chesapeake Amateurs have appeared before a public audience, we must say that the highest credit is due.
We close our notice by publishing the excellent Prologue, by Henry Montagu, which was written expressly for this occasion, & spoken by him before the Curtain rose.
Prologue By Hy Montagu
Friends, Patrons of the "Thespian" art; I stand,
as spokesman for our little stage-struck band;
I come kind friends, respectfully to pray
Indulgent smiles for this our little play
Think not that we aspire to win a "Name"
In the high path of Histrionic fame:
Or that misled by fierce dramatic rage,
We hope like "Lear" to strut upon the stage:
No 'tis the aim of our most humble modest Muse
To please our patrons, and ourselves amuse,
Just this, no more, as Amateurs we come
Let this avowal strike the critics dumb.
Tonight, then, if our humble skill avails
We represent a legend of "Marseilles"
"Bombastes," next with love and fame elate,
Shall claim your laughter and your mirth create:
Joy, pathos, fun, e'en murder's sanguine strain
Mingle and follow in our motley train
Thus at the "Clerk's" sad fate, droops pity's eye,
Yet "Simon's" suppers, funds of mirth supply,
With horror "Darnaud's" vices now regard
And yield to Adolpho's love its due reward
Then comes "Bombastes" may he please you all
And may you laugh until the curtain fall
Well, then, my friends, scare not our sailor's muse
Nor to our first trial, applause refuse,
So shall our tread each moment firmer grow
And the dramatic fire more warmly glow.
Encourage this our unfledg'd wings first flight
We'll strive and please you more another night,
With grateful pride, I cast around my gaze
And see a host of varied beauty blaze
Soft beaming eyes, sweet lips, in smiles arrayed
Which might have well Herculean toils repaid
Their praise we covet, may we win the meed
Our labor's light, the guerdon great indeed
But hark! (Bell rings) our little troop impatient rage,
Anxious to "strut their hour" upon the stage.
And now my friends with Avon's Bard, I pray
Gently you'll judge, kindly you'll hear our play.

On Thursday evening the Amateurs of HMS ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
performed for the first time at the CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

Lyric Theatre. The Drama performed was The Seven Clerks" or the Thief & the Denouncer.
We cannot speak too highly of the creditable manner in which the performers acted, although a shore going paper has been pleased to insult them, and to cast a baneful shadow over their efforts to please. We only regret that such a splenetic effusion should have ever been permitted to appear in print; the more especially as we consider that jealousy, that greeneyed monster: was the cause of the unwarrantable attack upon the labours of our men.
The purely acrimonious composition and illiberal manner in which the several "dramatis personae" are pulled to pieces could not have proceeded from any other source, than that of envy and vexation at the successful result of the entertainment, which the writer who is doubtless a member of the CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

Amateur Performers, never before witnessed, when himself and fellow players have acted.
But we can afford to take no more notice of him.
The Drama was ably supported by the various characters, X

George Horner

George Horner, a bandsman, joined the Chesapeake on August 12, 1857. He was born in London in 1817. The muster book for the Chesapeake claims to offer the first entry for George Horner, perhaps meaning this was his first time at sea."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
Geo Horner as the Miser, Claude Darnaud was perfect, and X

Henry Underhill

Henry Underhill, an ordinary seaman from Alesford, was thirty-six when he came aboard the Chesapeake."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
Hy Underhill as Simon Siggel, in the hunger which he so well portrayed, produced a sympathetic feeling, which we were under the necessity of allaying directly the theatre closed. We unfortunately cannot spare the space to bring all of the actors to notice, but it will be enough to say that they gave general satisfaction with the exception of our rancorous friend.
The conclusion, the laughable burlesque tragic opera Bombastes Furioso, was ably sustained and to Henry UnderhillX

Henry Underhill

Henry Underhill, an ordinary seaman from Alesford, was thirty-six when he came aboard the Chesapeake."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
as General Bombastes, we must here give the palm for the inimitable manner in which he carried out his part.
The band of the ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
attended and contributed largely to the entertainment, a prologue written expressly for the occasion by one of the performers was highly thought of and a hornpipe by Thomas Walsh was enthusiastically encored.
We were very glad to see the front circles so well filled, the ladies appearing to enjoy the novel scene, especially, and we may say that the whole passed off most satisfactorily.

XSome of the items in this report of naval intelligence appear as the fifth contribution to issue 12 in Bampfield's Extracts. Bampfield does not provide an author's initial.

  • H.M. Gunboat Roebuck arrived on Wednesday afternoon bringing Commander G. H. ParkinX

    George H. Parkin

    George H. Parkin was named acting commander of HMS Chesapeake on February 1, 1858, and he came aboard on February 25 after serving aboard Roebuck. "Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
    to join the "ChesapeakeX
    HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    ."
  • H.M.S. ChesapeakeX
    HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    is to sail on Monday for MadrasX

    Madras is now known as Chennai

    , whither she will convey Viscountess CanningX

    Canning

    From “Canning [née Stuart], Charlotte Elizabeth, Countess Canning” by by K. D. Reynolds in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Canning [née Stuart], Charlotte Elizabeth, Countess Canning (1817–1861), courtier and vicereine of India, was born at the British embassy in Paris on 31 March 1817, the elder of the two daughters of Sir Charles Stuart, later Baron Stuart de Rothesay (1779–1845), diplomatist, and his wife, Lady Elizabeth Yorke (1789–1867), daughter of the third earl of Hardwicke. Like her sister Louisa [see Beresford, Louisa, marchioness of Waterford], Charlotte Stuart was celebrated for her beauty, piety, and artistic talent. [. . .] At eighteen she married, on 5 September 1835, Charles John Canning (1812–1862), only surviving son of the prime minister, George Canning, and heir to his mother's viscountcy. [. . .] In June 1855 Lord Canning accepted the post of governor-general of India. ‘[I] will not take any part in the decision but only be ready to follow like a dog,' [. . .] his wife wrote, rather dispiritedly. They left London in November, travelling to Calcutta via Paris, Malta, and Egypt, pausing in Bombay, Ceylon, and Madras before reaching their destination on 29 February 1856. [. . .] The year of the Indian mutiny, 1857, put a tremendous emotional and physical strain on the Cannings. Charlotte was kept well away from the dangerous areas, but she gathered information assiduously, keeping the queen informed in detail of the events as they unfolded, and was able to dispel some of the worst atrocity stories: ‘there is not a particle of evidence of the poor women having been “ill-used” anywhere’, she wrote. [. . .](Death, murder, starvation, and the mutilation of corpses did not compare to the horror felt at the idea of interracial rape.) To Lady Canning, the queen was able regularly to express her complete confidence in the beleaguered Canning, who was under continual pressure from the British at home and in India to exact a bloody retribution. Canning was able to rely on his wife to communicate with his colleagues in Britain when the pressures of the situation overwhelmed his correspondence. [. . .] The revolt over, Canning was elevated to an earldom, the government of India was removed from the hands of the East India Company, and the governor-generalship was transformed into a viceroyalty. The new vicereine travelled widely throughout India, from Madras in the south, to the borders of Tibet in the north. She sketched and painted as she went, and wrote detailed accounts of her travels to her family and to the queen. Despite the difficulties, she had come to enjoy India, but was looking forward to her frequently postponed return to England, which was set for January 1862. In October 1861 she journeyed through Darjeeling, to the borders of Sikkim, and saw Mount Everest, but her mind was on home and planning for the future there. She returned to Calcutta on 8 November, clearly suffering from ‘jungle fever’, or malaria. Four days later she was confined to bed, and shortly afterwards her mind started wandering, and she died at 2.30 in the morning of 18 November."
    . The Hon. Mrs Stuart, the Hon Capt Stanley, & Attendants.
XThis pun appears as the seventh contribution to issue 12 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield attributes the contribution to "B."
said a polite gentleman to a lady who was overcome by the heat, "O! yes, Sir, if you please," replied the fainting beauty "a little lemon-ade."

XThese conundrums do not appear as questions, but they do appear later with answers in Bampfield's extracts.

  • 22. When the cook lets the salad fall into the fireplace, what great saracen hero, would you be reminded of?
  • 23. When is a noise like a troublesome creditor?

XThis conundrum appears as the fourth contribution to issue 12 in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "L."

  • 21. Supposing a number of bottles were broken by the fall of a tree, what ejaculation would they give vent to?
    0 Bottles broken by the falling tree (Good fates attend us)
    If you could speak, I think your cry would be. Tree, mend us!! (Tremendous)

XThis rebus does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

Rebus. Ba boo

XOnly one of these conundrums (the baker kneads) appears as the first contribution to issue 11 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield attributes the contribution to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.

  • 19. When does a baker most want materials for his trade? When he kneads (needs) his dough.
  • 20. When does a good idea resemble a bone of a fowl? When its a merry thought.

XThis publication information does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

Published at the office No. 1 Port Street
"Chesapeake" every Saturday.
contributions solicited
Saturday 27 February, 1858.
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"The Young Idea"

Chesapeake Chronicle and Weekly Journal

Saturday March 6th 1858

No. 13

XThis article appears in the same position (first contribution to issue 13) in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.
Once more the fresh sea breezes fan our heated brows, and we feel their invigorating influence; again in the quiet routine of a sea life we can sit down to peruse our latest intelligence from home, to dream over the past, to form conjectures on the future; again we partake of the pleasures of quiescence, after the excitement attendant upon our stay at CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

.
We can now look back and ponder upon all we have seen and done, fixing the past scenes and events firm ly in our memories, in that handy memorandum-book, whence in future days we may glean pleasure to ourselves and others by drawing forth from the hidden stores, with which it is enriched: many any interesting account of the "City of Palaces" and other places we have visited, and yet may visit.
In our present trip we are happily not Entirely debarred from the generous influence, which is ever cast over man by the presence and society of the "fair sex", and even the knowledge that we are conveying to MadrasX

Madras is now known as Chennai

, the Viscountess CanningX

Canning

From “Canning [née Stuart], Charlotte Elizabeth, Countess Canning” by by K. D. Reynolds in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Canning [née Stuart], Charlotte Elizabeth, Countess Canning (1817–1861), courtier and vicereine of India, was born at the British embassy in Paris on 31 March 1817, the elder of the two daughters of Sir Charles Stuart, later Baron Stuart de Rothesay (1779–1845), diplomatist, and his wife, Lady Elizabeth Yorke (1789–1867), daughter of the third earl of Hardwicke. Like her sister Louisa [see Beresford, Louisa, marchioness of Waterford], Charlotte Stuart was celebrated for her beauty, piety, and artistic talent. [. . .] At eighteen she married, on 5 September 1835, Charles John Canning (1812–1862), only surviving son of the prime minister, George Canning, and heir to his mother's viscountcy. [. . .] In June 1855 Lord Canning accepted the post of governor-general of India. ‘[I] will not take any part in the decision but only be ready to follow like a dog,' [. . .] his wife wrote, rather dispiritedly. They left London in November, travelling to Calcutta via Paris, Malta, and Egypt, pausing in Bombay, Ceylon, and Madras before reaching their destination on 29 February 1856. [. . .] The year of the Indian mutiny, 1857, put a tremendous emotional and physical strain on the Cannings. Charlotte was kept well away from the dangerous areas, but she gathered information assiduously, keeping the queen informed in detail of the events as they unfolded, and was able to dispel some of the worst atrocity stories: ‘there is not a particle of evidence of the poor women having been “ill-used” anywhere’, she wrote. [. . .](Death, murder, starvation, and the mutilation of corpses did not compare to the horror felt at the idea of interracial rape.) To Lady Canning, the queen was able regularly to express her complete confidence in the beleaguered Canning, who was under continual pressure from the British at home and in India to exact a bloody retribution. Canning was able to rely on his wife to communicate with his colleagues in Britain when the pressures of the situation overwhelmed his correspondence. [. . .] The revolt over, Canning was elevated to an earldom, the government of India was removed from the hands of the East India Company, and the governor-generalship was transformed into a viceroyalty. The new vicereine travelled widely throughout India, from Madras in the south, to the borders of Tibet in the north. She sketched and painted as she went, and wrote detailed accounts of her travels to her family and to the queen. Despite the difficulties, she had come to enjoy India, but was looking forward to her frequently postponed return to England, which was set for January 1862. In October 1861 she journeyed through Darjeeling, to the borders of Sikkim, and saw Mount Everest, but her mind was on home and planning for the future there. She returned to Calcutta on 8 November, clearly suffering from ‘jungle fever’, or malaria. Four days later she was confined to bed, and shortly afterwards her mind started wandering, and she died at 2.30 in the morning of 18 November."
and Honble Mrs Stuart, deprives us of the general laxity which chaView Page
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racterizes us at sea, and causes us to pay more regard to the higher essentials of good breeding, casting aside the ordinary roughness which we assume as soon as the anchor is weighed.
We hope that a speedy passage may be our fortune, and that it may be our lot to drop anchor once more in the quiet, peaceful harbour of TrincomaleeX

Trincomalee is now known as Trincomalee

, there to enjoy the many pleasures which this little spot affords.

XThis letter appears in the same position in Bampfield's Extracts and is attributed to "J."

Dear Sir.
Accept the congratulations of a friend on the completion of your 12th number and the inauguration of your 13th.
The "Young Idea" has now passed triumphant thro' those various dangers to which infancy is subject:- it is in its "teens", and its growing strength and vigour may give good hope that it is not intended to come to an early end.
Breathing manly and generous sentiments, enriched with an undercurrent of quiet humour, free from all those personalities, which at first were dreaded, faithfully recording the thoughts and actions of those on board the "ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
"
"The Young Idea" is now established amongst us as a welcome weekly visitor, and as such I trust it may appear before us each Saturday, and only cease its visits with the return of our floating home to England, and the separation, and dispersion of the "ChesapeakeX
HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
s"
Believe me
Dear Sir
Yours Truly
"Shipmate"
Ed. We feel highly flattered, and can only say that our success is our reward.

XThis letter appears as the third contribution to issue 12 (a completely different issue) in Bampfield's extracts and is attributed to "W."

To the Editor of the "Young Idea"
Dear Sir
Much disappointment has been caused by your passing over with so slight a mention, what we have considered one of the principal events in our nautical existence; namely the landing of our Bluejackets, and Marines on the morning of the 19th February, for exercise on the CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

Esplanade. All performed their part so well, all returned to the ship so pleased at their own performance, that I hope, Mr. Editor you will not consider me too obtrusive if I beg for a little longer notice. Everybody knows that the soul of an Editor is everywhere present and that he sees everything and that nothing can escape his keep observation
I will not stop to comment on the glass of medicinal liquid which was served out to us on deck before we started, and which I think they called Quinine Wine, and will only suggest to the Doctor that most of us thought a little drop of Rum (neat) would have comforted our inner man much more to our satisfaction.View Page
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Our boats were quickly manned, and no time was lost in reaching the shore, and scrambling up the river's bank. It was but just daylight when we were drawn up in order, and commenced our march along the river side. Our pioneers led the way armed with crowbars, and shovels, under the guidance of two Engineers, and showed that they would be as serviceable in the trenches as in the stoke hole: then came our lively band, which made us step out like men, next the company of Marines (Artillery and Light Infantry), then the Bluejackets in their several Divisions:-like men, I say for however we may admire the mechanical march of drilled soldiers, I hope Bluejackets will always have the free use of their arms and legs.
When we arrived on the field of action, our Artillery Companies separated and marched to Fort William to bring out their Field pieces, while we remained exercising in the field: it would weary your readers, Mr. Editor to describe the whole course of our proceedings, how we prepared to resist cavalry, formed into square &c-&c:- suffice it to say that great satisfaction was caused to ourselves, and great wonderment to the native niggers, and we only wished that a few hundred Sepoys were there to practice upon in real earnest. As for the Marine Light Infantry they went right away all over the field and I did not wonder at their having a jolly good run - skirmishing they called it - after being so long penned up on board ship.
The "bang, bang", of our field pieces, now drew the attention of all CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

upon us, and the fashionable ladies and gentlemen who were out riding, came flocking round us to see so novel a spectacle. The artillery did as beautifully as all the rest of us, and even the small guns worked by small boys, made a very considerable noise on this eventful occasion. But everything must have an end, Mr Editor, so had our field practice, & so also must my letter. See us again drawn up in the line of march, again the lively strains of the "Cheasapeake's" band float over the CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

Esplanade, & crowds of Hindoo niggers flock round to see the Regiment of British Tars returning to their "Wooden Walls"
It would be unjust not to mention how these wooden walls were guarded in our absence, and how gallantly the Idlers on board prepared to repel boarders in case of invasion:- Those who saw the ship's tailor, doing sentry's duty, with his shears laid aside, and his cutlass girded round him, saw what is not seen every day in Her Majesty's Service.
Believe me,
Dear Sir,
Yours Respectfully
Bluejacket

XThis article does not appear in Bampfield's extracts.

There is nothing spoken, done, written or effected in this world, but the ever ready View Page
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tongue of criticism is prepared to weaken or destroy its effect. We certainly expected that our Amateurs would not come off scatheless, but we were totally unprepared for such an egregious attack as has been made upon them in the Bengal Hurkaru. It was with mingled feelings of astonishment, anger, and amusement we perused the inconsiderate critique upon their endeavours. The whole when carefully weighed forms a "tout ensemble" of the most ridiculous character, and we therefore advise all those who read it to take it in that light, basing their opinions, not merely upon a sentence extracted here and there but upon the general sentiment it contains. It opens with a personal cut at Mr. Van Gelder, thereby evincing that a wish to bring him before the public as a laughing stock, was a prominent feature in the desire to ridicule, which animated the narrow mind, which presumed to judge of our Amateurs performance. The writer then proceeds to state that "he trembled for the fate of those of Neptune's Hardy Sons"—for why? because "the beauty and fashion of CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

were present," most likely he imagined the "hardy sons of Neptune" could never stand a battery of bright eyes, however brave when confronting a battery of heavy guns. But we cannot afford space to pull him to pieces in the manner he deserves, but we must notice one thing. The word "Ditchers." such is the very euphonious appellation which the Histrionic Critic of the Hurkaru claims for himself and his copeers of CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

. We will not now enquire into the origin of the name, but simply observe that such being the title of our assailant, we need not feel surprised to find him such an adept in the art of "flinging mud." We close this article by publishing the Prologue which was read and written expressly for the occasion.

Prologue

Friends, Patrons of the "Thespian" art; I stand, as spokesman for our little stage struck band; I come kind friends, respectfully to pray Indulgent smiles for this our little play Think not that we aspire to win a "Name" In the high path of Histrionic fame: Or that misled by fierce dramatic rage, We hope like "Lear" to strut upon the stage: No 'tis the aim of our most humble Muse To please our patrons, and ourselves amuse, Just this, no more, as Amateurs we come Let this avowal strike the critics dumb. Tonight, then, if our humble skill avails We represent a legent of "Marseilles" "Bombastes," next with love and fame elate, Shall claim your laughter and your mirth create: Joy, pathos, fun, e'en murder's sanguine strain Mingle and follow in our motley train Thus at the "Clerk's" sad fate, droops pity's eye, Yet "Simon's suppers, funds of mirth supply, With horror "Darnaud's vices now regard And yield to Adolpho's love its due reward Then comes "Bombastes" may he please you all And may you laugh until the curtain fall Well, then, my friends, scare not our sailor's muse Nor to our first trial, applause refuse, So shall our tread each moment firmer grow And the dramatic fire more warmly glow. Encourage this our unfledg'd wings first flight We'll strive and please you more another night, With grateful pride, I cast around my gaze And see a host of English beauty blaze Soft beaming eyes, sweet lips, in smiles arrayed Which might have well Herculean toils repaid Their praise we covet, may we win the meed Our labor's light, the guerdon great indeed But hark! (Bell rings) our little troop impatient rage, Anxious to strut their hour upon the stage. And now my friends with Avon's Bard, I pray Gently you'll judge, kindly you'll hear our play.
As MontaguX

Henry Montagu

Henry Montagu, yeoman of signals, joined the Chesapeake on July 28, 1857, after serving aboard HMS President. He was born in St. Hilliers, Jersey (the Channel Islands) in 1826, making him thirty-two at the time of the performance."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31, March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
was the composer of this really creditable piece. We are glad to say that the other CalcuttaX

Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

Journals, gave a very good account of the performance.

XThis naval intelligence appears under the heading "epitome" as the fourth contribution to issue 13 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield does not supply an author's initial.

  • 1st March H.M.S. ChesapeakeX
    HMS Chesapeake was a Royal Navy screw frigate with fifty-one guns in the Forte (or Imperieuse) class, which was one of several classes including the thirty new wooden screw frigates completed between 1849 and 1865 (197). She was built in dry dock, launched on September 7, 1855, and her masting and fitting-out was completed on August 28, 1857. She was 212 feet long, 50 feet 2 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 16 feet and 9 inches. She was built for a company of 515 men. The Chesapeake was sold in 1867 to be broken up for parts at Charlton (200). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    unmoored this morning & proceeded down the HooghlyX

    Hooghly is now known as Hugli River

    . She came to anchor at 3.
  • 2d Weighed at 12.10 and proceeded, anchoring at half past 4. On letting go the Port Anchor when the strain came on the cable it parted close to the bitts. Let go starboard anchor.
  • 3d Weighed at 10.30 and proceeded, anchored at 4.30 off KedgereeX

    Kedgeree is now known as Khejuri

    .
  • 4th Weighed at 9.20 a.m. and anchored at 12.30 p.m. The Steamer CanningX
    The Lady Canning was a 4-gun sloop "built for and operated by the Indian Navy (from 1830 the successor to the Bombay Marine arm of the East India Company)" (172). She was launched on March 24, 1857. She was 175 feet long, 24 feet 8 inches at the broadest point, with a depth in the hold of 14 feet. Her fate is unknown (173).David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All the Ships of the Royal Navy, 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    arrived from CalcuttaX

    Calcutta is now known as Kolkata

    , and anchored alongside about 3 bringing down Viscountess CanningX

    Canning

    From “Canning [née Stuart], Charlotte Elizabeth, Countess Canning” by by K. D. Reynolds in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Canning [née Stuart], Charlotte Elizabeth, Countess Canning (1817–1861), courtier and vicereine of India, was born at the British embassy in Paris on 31 March 1817, the elder of the two daughters of Sir Charles Stuart, later Baron Stuart de Rothesay (1779–1845), diplomatist, and his wife, Lady Elizabeth Yorke (1789–1867), daughter of the third earl of Hardwicke. Like her sister Louisa [see Beresford, Louisa, marchioness of Waterford], Charlotte Stuart was celebrated for her beauty, piety, and artistic talent. [. . .] At eighteen she married, on 5 September 1835, Charles John Canning (1812–1862), only surviving son of the prime minister, George Canning, and heir to his mother's viscountcy. [. . .] In June 1855 Lord Canning accepted the post of governor-general of India. ‘[I] will not take any part in the decision but only be ready to follow like a dog,' [. . .] his wife wrote, rather dispiritedly. They left London in November, travelling to Calcutta via Paris, Malta, and Egypt, pausing in Bombay, Ceylon, and Madras before reaching their destination on 29 February 1856. [. . .] The year of the Indian mutiny, 1857, put a tremendous emotional and physical strain on the Cannings. Charlotte was kept well away from the dangerous areas, but she gathered information assiduously, keeping the queen informed in detail of the events as they unfolded, and was able to dispel some of the worst atrocity stories: ‘there is not a particle of evidence of the poor women having been “ill-used” anywhere’, she wrote. [. . .](Death, murder, starvation, and the mutilation of corpses did not compare to the horror felt at the idea of interracial rape.) To Lady Canning, the queen was able regularly to express her complete confidence in the beleaguered Canning, who was under continual pressure from the British at home and in India to exact a bloody retribution. Canning was able to rely on his wife to communicate with his colleagues in Britain when the pressures of the situation overwhelmed his correspondence. [. . .] The revolt over, Canning was elevated to an earldom, the government of India was removed from the hands of the East India Company, and the governor-generalship was transformed into a viceroyalty. The new vicereine travelled widely throughout India, from Madras in the south, to the borders of Tibet in the north. She sketched and painted as she went, and wrote detailed accounts of her travels to her family and to the queen. Despite the difficulties, she had come to enjoy India, but was looking forward to her frequently postponed return to England, which was set for January 1862. In October 1861 she journeyed through Darjeeling, to the borders of Sikkim, and saw Mount Everest, but her mind was on home and planning for the future there. She returned to Calcutta on 8 November, clearly suffering from ‘jungle fever’, or malaria. Four days later she was confined to bed, and shortly afterwards her mind started wandering, and she died at 2.30 in the morning of 18 November."
    , the Honble Mr rs Stuart and attendants. The
  • Commodore went for her ladyship in his barge, and was received on her coming on board, with a guard of Marines, the band, & the officers in undress.
  • 5th Weighed this morning at 11. Lady CanningX

    Canning

    From “Canning [née Stuart], Charlotte Elizabeth, Countess Canning” by by K. D. Reynolds in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Canning [née Stuart], Charlotte Elizabeth, Countess Canning (1817–1861), courtier and vicereine of India, was born at the British embassy in Paris on 31 March 1817, the elder of the two daughters of Sir Charles Stuart, later Baron Stuart de Rothesay (1779–1845), diplomatist, and his wife, Lady Elizabeth Yorke (1789–1867), daughter of the third earl of Hardwicke. Like her sister Louisa [see Beresford, Louisa, marchioness of Waterford], Charlotte Stuart was celebrated for her beauty, piety, and artistic talent. [. . .] At eighteen she married, on 5 September 1835, Charles John Canning (1812–1862), only surviving son of the prime minister, George Canning, and heir to his mother's viscountcy. [. . .] In June 1855 Lord Canning accepted the post of governor-general of India. ‘[I] will not take any part in the decision but only be ready to follow like a dog,' [. . .] his wife wrote, rather dispiritedly. They left London in November, travelling to Calcutta via Paris, Malta, and Egypt, pausing in Bombay, Ceylon, and Madras before reaching their destination on 29 February 1856. [. . .] The year of the Indian mutiny, 1857, put a tremendous emotional and physical strain on the Cannings. Charlotte was kept well away from the dangerous areas, but she gathered information assiduously, keeping the queen informed in detail of the events as they unfolded, and was able to dispel some of the worst atrocity stories: ‘there is not a particle of evidence of the poor women having been “ill-used” anywhere’, she wrote. [. . .](Death, murder, starvation, and the mutilation of corpses did not compare to the horror felt at the idea of interracial rape.) To Lady Canning, the queen was able regularly to express her complete confidence in the beleaguered Canning, who was under continual pressure from the British at home and in India to exact a bloody retribution. Canning was able to rely on his wife to communicate with his colleagues in Britain when the pressures of the situation overwhelmed his correspondence. [. . .] The revolt over, Canning was elevated to an earldom, the government of India was removed from the hands of the East India Company, and the governor-generalship was transformed into a viceroyalty. The new vicereine travelled widely throughout India, from Madras in the south, to the borders of Tibet in the north. She sketched and painted as she went, and wrote detailed accounts of her travels to her family and to the queen. Despite the difficulties, she had come to enjoy India, but was looking forward to her frequently postponed return to England, which was set for January 1862. In October 1861 she journeyed through Darjeeling, to the borders of Sikkim, and saw Mount Everest, but her mind was on home and planning for the future there. She returned to Calcutta on 8 November, clearly suffering from ‘jungle fever’, or malaria. Four days later she was confined to bed, and shortly afterwards her mind started wandering, and she died at 2.30 in the morning of 18 November."
    & retinue on board for MadrasX

    Madras is now known as Chennai

    .
  • The Chinese mail was boarded and by it Commodore WatsonX

    Commodore Rundle Burges Watson

    From “Watson, Rundle Burges” by by J. K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Watson, Rundle Burges (1809–1860), naval officer, was the eldest son of Captain Joshua Rowley Watson (1772–1810). He entered the navy in November 1821, and was promoted lieutenant on 7 October 1829. [. . .] On 23 December 1842 he was advanced to post rank, and on 24 December was made a CB. [. . .] In December 1852 [Watson] was appointed to the new steam frigate Impérieuse (50 guns), then, and for some years later, considered one of the finest ships in the navy. In 1854 she was sent into the Baltic in advance of the fleet, Watson being senior officer of the squadron of small vessels appointed to watch the breaking up of the ice, and to see that no Russian warships got to sea. It was an arduous service well performed. The Impérieuse continued with the flying squadron in the Baltic during the campaigns of 1854 and 1855, and until the signing of peace in March 1856. As the senior officer of the frigate squadron, and generally on detached service, Watson demonstrated the highest standards of seamanship, judgement, and leadership. After the peace the Impérieuse was sent to the North American station; she returned to England and was paid off early in 1857. From May 1856 until his death Watson was naval aide-de-camp to the queen. In June 1859 he was appointed captain-superintendent of Sheerness Dockyard, where he died on 5 July 1860. An officer of great ability, Watson was one of the last great sailing-ship captains, and the first frigate captain of the steam era."
    received despatches from Adm l SeymourX

    Seymour

    From “Seymour, Frederick Beauchamp Paget, Baron Alcester” by by J. K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: "Seymour, Frederick Beauchamp Paget, Baron Alcester (1821–1895), naval officer, was born in London on 12 April 1821. He was the son of Colonel Sir Horace Beauchamp Seymour and his first wife, Elizabeth Malet, née Palk (d. 1827), daughter of Sir Lawrence Palk, bt; his grandfather was Lord Hugh Seymour, and his uncle Sir George Francis Seymour. He received his early education at Eton College, and entered the navy in January 1834. [...] In May 1855 [Seymour] was appointed to the floating battery Meteor, which he took out to the Crimea, and brought back to Portsmouth in the early summer of 1856. In July 1857 he commissioned the Pelorus, which he commanded for nearly six years on the Australian station. Between January and April 1858 the Pelorus provided a naval brigade in Burma, playing a vital role in preventing the spread of the mutiny from India. From 1860 to 1861 he commanded the naval brigade in New Zealand during the war there, for which he was made a CB on 16 July 1861."
    .
  • Mr BrownriggX

    Charles J. Brownrigg

    Charles J. Brownrigg, a mate (a commissioned officer), joined the Chesapeake on August 4th, 1857. His age was not recorded in the muster book."Muster Book of Her Majesty's Ship Chesapeake Commencing 1st January 1858 Ending 31st March 1858," National Archives at Kew (ADM 38/2884)
    received official intimation of his promotion to Lieutenant, & leaves the Gun Room Mess, much to their regret.

XOnly the "Ava-launch" joke from this contribution appears as the fifth contribution to issue 13 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield attributes the contribution to "R.M."

A human specimen of the Vegetable Kingdom. A man with carrotty locks, reddish cheeks, a turn up nose, and a sage expression of countenance. When we add a mouth enclosed by two lips (tulips) we think we have described a decided link between the animal and vegetable kingdom.
A friend enquires whether, when the unfortunate "AvaX
The steamship Ava was not a Royal Navy vessel.
" was launched, the scene presented was an "Avalanche"
A correspondent has sent us the following Riddle. What country in Africa is like fresh brewed malt liquour? Answer Nubia (New Beer) Really after this we must exclaim "What next?"

X"Epitome" appears (alongside information from naval intelligence) as the fourth contribution to issue 13 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield does not supply an author's initial.

  • The AvaX
    The steamship Ava was not a Royal Navy vessel.
    P.&O Co.'s steam packet has been totally wrecked near TrincomaleeX

    Trincomalee is now known as Trincomalee

    with 25 lakhs of rupees & the mails on board.
  • The Leviathan is afloat.
  • Capt PeelX

    Captain Peel

    From “Peel, Sir William” by by J. K. Laughton, rev. Andrew Lambert, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: :"Peel, Sir William (1824–1858), naval officer, third and favourite son of Sir Robert Peel, second baronet (1788–1850) [and] prime minister. [...] On 13 September 1856 [Peel] commissioned the Shannon, a powerful 50-gun steamfrigate, for service in China. She did not sail until the following March. At Singapore she was met by the news of the Indian mutiny, and took Lord Elgin up to Hong Kong, arriving on 2 July. Admiral Sir Michael Seymour sent the Shannon back to Calcutta on July 16, with Elgin on board, together with a detachment of marines and soldiers. At Calcutta, Peel formed a naval brigade. On 14 August he left the ship with 450 men, six 24-pounder Bengal artillery guns, and two 8 inch howitzers. At Allahabad on 20 October he was reinforced by a party of 120 men, and from then on was present in all the principal operations. The coolness of his bravery was everywhere remarkable, and his formidable battery gave most efficient service: the huge guns were, under his orders, moved and worked as though they were light field pieces. On 21 January 1858 he was nominated a KCB and an aidede-camp to the queen. In 1858 Peel's brigade employed six naval 8 inch guns from the Shannon. Peel mounted these massive weapons, weighing 65 cwt each, on carriages locally constructed by the sailors. They provided the firepower to overcome the massive walls of Indian forts, and to keep down British casualties. In the second relief of Lucknow on 9 March 1858 Peel was severely wounded in the thigh by a musket bullet, which was cut out from the opposite side of the leg. Still very weak, he reached Cawnpore on his way to England, and there, on 20 April, he contracted smallpox, of which he died on 27 April, aged thirty-three."
    has been rewarded with a K.C.B.
  • H.M.S. PyladesX
    HMS Pylades was a Royal Navy First class Corvette with twenty-one guns, the only vessel in the Pylades class. The Admiralty ordered the ship on December 24, 1852. She was launched on November 23, 1854 and her masting and fitting-out was completed on March 29, 1855. The length of the gundeck was 192 feet and 9 inches, the breadth at the broadest part of the ship was 38 feet, and the depth in the hold was 23 feet and 11 inches. It is unclear how many men served on Pylades class vessels, but Jason class vessels (also 21-gun Corvettes) carried 240 men (210). As David Lyon and Rif Winfield explain, "Corvette designs were rapidly enlarged over the 1860s, as the corvette began to take over the traditional frigate role of policing the high seas. To this end they were all built as steam auxiliaries, designed to cruise under sail" (207). The Pylades was broken up for parts on January 23, 1875 (208). David Lyon and Rif Winfield, The Sail & Steam Navy List: All The Ships of The Royal Navy 1815–1889 (London: Chatham Publishing), 2004.
    goes shortly to Suez

XThis rebus appears under the heading "charade" as the sixth contribution to issue 12 (an entirely different issue) in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield attributes the contribution to "McA," which suggests it was written by McArthur.

My first, what is my first? a counterfeit, my second, rears its dangerous rugged head, When the rude blast the heaving waters lash Their crested tops, All foam & busy spray Till safely past the fresh'ning gales to we go My whole oh! Emerald Isle how dear to thee Emblem of Hearts, so light so blithe, so gay
a trick its every sound proclaims a cheat From the blue ocean's broad expansive bed The Jurors billow o'er its surface deck Till the poor sailors heart with firm dismay And far astern is left the howling surge St Patrick's day on many a breast shall see Edgland is proud, to hold thee in her sway

XThis enigma appears as the seventh contribution to issue 13 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield does not supply the author's initial.

    Conundrums

XThis conundrum appears as the sixth contribution to issue 13 in Bampfield's extracts. Bampfield does not supply the author's initial.

  • 22. Saladin the Great
  • 23. When its a dun

XThis publication info appears as the eighth (final) contribution to issue 13 in Bampfield's Extracts.

Published at the office No. 1 Port Street "Chesapeake" every Saturday.
contributions solicited
Saturday 27 February, 1858.